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Full text of "Make Mend For Victory"

M AKEHti END 



FOR VICTORY * BOOK NO.S- 



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CONSUMER'S VICTORY PLEDGE: 








"As a consumer, in the total defense of democracy, I will do 




\ 




my part to make my home, 


my community, my country 






ready, efficient, strong. 










I will buy carefully — and I will not buy anything above 








the ceiling price, no matter '. 


how much I may want it. 








I will take good care of the 


things I have — and I will not 






buy anything made from vital war materials which I can 








get along without. 










I will waste nothing — and I will take care to salvage 








everything needed to win the war." , 










Consumer Division, 










Office of Price Administration 








It's up to you to keep the home fires burning, 


tons in your closet and bring 


them up to 






to see that you and your family stay easy-on- 


date. Come on. take those old knockabouts 




-. 


the-eyes. Fortunately, you can be patriotic 


and turn them into knockouts, keep that 






and pretty both. It's easy to teach an old 


glint in Uncle Sam's eye and still do your 






wardrobe new tricks, to resurrect the skele- 


stint towards Victory! 








TABLE OF 


CONTENTS 








I In The Basket .... Page 4 


V Cutting Up In A Big Way 


Page 31 






What You Need in Your 


a. You Have the Goods on 








Sewing Basket and How to 


Him (How to convert a 








Conserve What You Have 


man's suit into a woman's 
suit) 


Page 32 






II Life Extension .... Page 5 


b.The Shirt Off His Back 
(Interesting ways to use 








How to Mend and Patch 


men's shirts to good ad- 
vantage) 


Page 40 






III Fit For Anything . . . Page 9 


c. There's Life in the Old 








Alterations and Restyling 


Girl Yet (Suggestions for 
restyling women's and 








IV Variety Is The Spice Of 

Life Page 13 


girls' clothing) 
d. Junior Editions (How to 
make attractive clothes for 


Page 43 






a. White Collar Class (Dick- 


young folks) 


Page 44 






eys and collars) Page 14 


VI How To Reclaim Used 








b. Smart Headwork (Hats to 


Wool 


Page 47 
Page 48 






make and remake) Page 18 
c. Telling Trifles (Accessor- 
ies from scraps of yarn, 


VII Suggestions For Easy 

Sewing 






cotton and fabric) Page 26 


VIII List Of Materials . . . 


Page 50 






Copyright 1942, The Spool Cotton Company 


Printed in U.S. A 





;# 










H-9002 C-33— Second Edition 





WHAT YOU NEED IN YOUR SEWING 

BASKET AND HOW TO CONSERVE 

WHAT YOU HAVE . • . 



Care of Thread ... To avoid knotting and 
fraying, use the correct length of thread, about 
eighteen inches, or the distance from the middle 
finger to the elbow. To prevent thread from un- 
rolling from the spool, always tuck end in notch 
provided at outer edge. If this notch becomes 
broken, it is a simple matter to cut a new one 
with a razor blade. 



Sowing Needles ... Buy needles of superior 
material. Mil ward's, made of hand ground steel, 
have a smoothly finished eye which prevents 
the thread from fraying, a sharp smooth point 
which does not catch in the fabric. There is a 
size and type for every kind of sewing. See chart 
on p. 50. 

Care of Needles ... To preserve needles 
from rust, cut a strip of woolen material, wide 
enough to accommodate the longest needle and 
long enough to hold the number of needles ordi- 
narily used. Pink the edges. Fold at center a 
piece of tape or ribbon six inches long, and sew 
fold to center edge of width of piece. Stick needles 
on this woolen material when they are not being 
used. Roll it up and tie it. 

To sharpen needles use an emery, a small bag 
often made in the shape of a strawberry. Needles 
will rust if allowed to remain sticking in it. 

Crochet Hooks and Knitting Pins . . . 

Have a selection of these tools in the sizes you 
are most likely to use. Small and attractive ac- 
cessories can be made quickly and easily with 
them. 

Thread ... There is a thread for every pur- 
pose and it is wise to have an assortment on 
hand. Make a list of your ordinary sewing prob- 
lems and consult the chart on p. 50 to see what 
you should have. It is a waste of time and energy, 
if you have to run to the store every time you 
decide to sew. 



Scissors ... Buy the best scissors and shears 
you can afford. If you can have only one, buy 
good scissors about 8" in length. If you do much 
sewing, dressmaker's shears or pinking shears, 
8" in length, are a necessity. A small scissors is 
handy for cutting buttonholes, ripping seams 
and snipping thread. 

Care of Scissors ... Scissors for sewing 
must not be used to cut materials other than 
fabrics and thread. Paper dulls them badly. Keep 
scissors clean, as dust and dirt dull them. Apply 
frequently a drop of lubricating oil at the joint. 

Pins ... Brass dressmaker pins, sizes 5 and 6 
are very good. Pins of inferior quality spoil the 
fabric in which they are used. 

Care of Pins ... When you are using pins, 
wear a small pincushion held at the left wrist 
with an elastic. In this way, as soon as pins are 
removed, they may be salvaged very easily. Pins 
are hard to get, and if you pick them up and save 
them you are helping the war effort. 

A Tape Measure and a Yardstick are 

useful and necessary if you intend to sew. 

Zippers, Buttons, and Snaps . . . When 
you are discarding articles of clothing, look at 
the zippers, buttons and snaps. If they are still 
good, cut them off and use them again. 

Scraps of Fabric, Thread and Yarn . . . 

Do not discard your scraps. This book has many 
attractive suggestions for their use. 



For service — Use J. & P. Coats — Clark's <Sg 



threads in correct sizes 




HOW TO MEND AND PATCH 

You've no idea how quickly wilted wardrobes respond to kind- 
ness. Try the needle-and-thread treatment for that "just stepped 
out of a bandbox" look. Your girdles will keep you in shape indefi- 
nitely if you apply First Aid in time; with skillful mending your 
stockings will outlast all their contemporaries; and a judicious- — - 
and gallant — patch will keep many a dress going to a ripe old age. 




STOCKINGS 

General Directions ... Many 
things that can be done to lengthen 
the usefulness of stockings are de- 
scribed below. When you need to 
use darning thread, see p. 50 for cor- 
rect threads. Separate strands accord- 
ing to weight of stocking. Choose a 
shade a little darker than stocking as 
thread works in lighter. Use a darn- 
ing egg. (Fig. 1). Darn on right side. 

To Make Stockings 
Last Longer 

1. Buy two pairs of the same color 
at one time in the correct size, in a 
weight suitable to their use, and 
length in accordance with the length 
of leg and of girdle. 

2. Buy rayon stockings as follows: 

a. Buy cotton reinforced toes — or re- 
inforce on wrong side with cotton 
darning thread, weaving back and 
forth with small running stitches. 

b. Buy leg length about 2" shorter 
than silk or nylon — they are apt 
to stretch. 

3. Put stockings on carefully. 

a. Roll down to the toe and draw 
them up easily. Take care not to 
pull threads with rings, bracelets, 
cuticle, etc. 

b. Always fasten garters in double 
hem. If back garter comes at open- 
ing in double hem. sew this up. 




c. Fasten lisle stockings more loosely 
than others, as they do not have 
the same elasticity. 

4. Launder stockings carefully after 
each wearing in lukewarm water 
with mild soap flakes. Do not dry 
near heat. Allow to dry completely. 
Rayon stockings should be allowed 
to dry 48 hours. 

5. Examine for worn places and re- 
pair as follows: 

a. Reinforce worn places in foot with 
small running stitches parallel to 
weave. 

b. Mend split seams with an over 
and over stitch. 

c. Bring pulled threads through to 
wrong side and secure with tiny 
stitches to prevent runs. 

Darning a Hole . . . With stock- 
ing right side out, insert egg under 
hole. Trim ragged edges of hole. Do 
not use a knot and make lengthwise 
threads first. Leaving a short end 
free, take a few running stitches far 
enough from the hole to take in all 
the worn part. Turn, leaving a small 
loop at turning. On each succeeding 
row increase number of stitches so 
that when you come to the hole, you 
will cover it and also strengthen the 
worn part. Arrange stitches so that 
needle comes out over edges of hole. 
Decrease length of rows on other side 
of hole. Cut thread when finished and 
turn darn around. Weave stitches in 
the same way across the width over 
and under foundation stitches already 
made (Fig. 2). 

Mending Runs ... Thread ma- 
chine with matching 
mercerized thread. 
Turn stocking wrong 
side out. Fold so that 
run is on fold. Pin 
fold to piece of paper, 
stretching while pin- 
ning. Stitch by ma- 
chine close to edge. 
Pull paper apart to 
@ free stitches. Tie and 

clip ends of thread. 



GIRDLES 

To Make Girdles Last Longer 

1. When choosing a girdle: 

a. Buy the right size — size of a step- 
in is your waist measurement. 

b. Test length of garters in sitting 
position. If they pull, garter or 
stocking should be longer. 

2. When putting on a girdle: 

a. Use fleshy part of hand — not fin- 
gernails to take hold of elasticized 
fabric. 

b. Fasten garters straight and in cen- 
ter of double hem of stocking. 

3. Launder garment once a week. 
Rinse thoroughly and wrap it in a 
turkish towel. Keep it out of the sun 
and heat when drying. 

4. Alternate wear of garments each 
week if you have two. 

5. Examine the garment for worn 
places and repair as soon as they 
appear. 

Repair 

1. Elastic Webbing — Catch the end 
of each rubber thread that has pulled 
out and wrap it securely with J. & P. 
Coats Heavy Duty mercerized sew- 
ing thread so that it will hold and 
then darn it down into seam or fabric 
where it pulled out. Take care not to 
put your needle through any rubber 
threads for it will cut them. For the 
same reason do not stitch elastic web- 
bing on the machine. 

2. Fagotting — Use J. & P. Coats 
Heavy Duty mercerized thread and 
a catch stitch (see p. 49). 

3. Seams — Sew twill tape or satin 
fabric as a reinforcement on under 
side. When sewing on elasticized fab- 
ric catch stitch is always best to use 
because it has more "give." 

4. Garters — a. If only stitching has 
been broken, re-stitch. 

b. If rubber is lifeless, cut garters 
off and replace with new ones. 

c. If you cannot easily put the new 
garters between the double fabric, 
sew them onto the under side of 
garment and finish off with a tape 
or satin ribbon for additional rein- 
forcement. 




GLOVES 

Split seams in gloves are mended in 
manner of original stitching — - in 
whip stitch or running stitch. For 
heavy leathers, pigskin, capeskin, 
calf, use matching J. & P. Coats 
Heavy Duty mercerized thread. 
Clark's O.N.T. Brilliant is suitable 
for cotton, doeskin, etc. On lapped 
seams, sewed close by machine, if 
there is not enough for a seam, it is 
possible to make blanket stitches 
along edges of ripped seam to 
strengthen it. Use Mercerized Thread 
in a matching shade. Draw edges to- 
gether by overhanding through the 
blanket stitches (Fig. 3). Start with- 
out a knot, securing ends of stitching 
carefully and concealing all thread 
ends inside glove. 

FASTENERS 

General Directions ... Use 

Button and Carpet Thread for sew- 
ing buttons on men's and boys' heavy 
clothes. Use Heavy Duty Thread for 
fabrics with firm body. If there is 
unusual strain on a button or it is 
sewed to a single thickness of fabric, 
reinforce with a piece of garment 
fabric, folded into a square, and 
sewed on wrong side as button is 
sewed on (Fig. 4). Small buttons are 
used to reinforce buttons on over- 
coats (Fig. 5). 

Buttons ... Lap garment, and 
mark with a pin a point y s " from 
the end of buttonhole nearest edge. 
Using a double thread, knotted, in- 
sert needle from right side at marked 
point. Place button in position over 
knot and anchor in place by sewing 
through shank. If button has holes, 
after first stitch place a pin across 
top under thread to keep it loose (Fig. 
6). After sufficient stitches have been 
taken through holes, remove pin and 
wind thread between button and fab- 
ric several times to form a shank 
(Fig. 7). Bring thread to wrong side, 
take several small stitches, and run 
thread between two thicknesses of 
fabric before clipping. 



Snaps ... Sew snap fasteners with 
an over and over stitch using double 
thread and concealing knot under 
snap. Sew each hole separately and 
carry thread on wrong side of gar- 
ment to next hole (Fig. 8). Place 
snaps not more than 2" apart. Attach 
flat side first. Hold garment closed to 
mark point for other half of snap. 
Hooks and Eyes ... Sew hooks 
and eyes with double thread and an 
over and over stitch through holes. 
Sew over hook near top to hold it 
down. The straight metal bar, or 
thread bar worked with a blanket 
stitch is placed on seam line. The 
curved eye extends slightly beyond 
edge of opening (Fig. 9). 

AIDS TO GOOD 
GROOMING 

DRESS SHIELDS 

Secure shields in desired position with 
invisible stitches, taking stitches only 
through finished edge of shield. Tack 
shield at each end of curved seam to 
under armhole seam, leaving it loose 
enough that it will not pull when 
garment is on. Tack shield also to 
side and sleeve seams (Fig, 10). For 
coats and suits, use dark shields or 
cover them with lining material. 

BELT LOOPS 

Mark half the width of belt above 
and below waistline. Using double 
thread, knot ends, and insert needle 
through seam from wrong side at top 
marking. Reinforce this point with 
small buttonhole stitch (see p. 49). 
Make large loop by taking another 
stitch in same place. Do not draw 
stitch all the way through. Place 
thumb and forefinger in loop. Using 
forefinger, draw thread through loop, 
thus making another loop. Draw this 
loop out, tightening first one (Fig. 
11). Continue chain of loops to de- 
sired length. Pass needle through last 
loop and draw thread tightly to close 
chain. Insert needle in seam at sec- 
ond marking, draw through to wrong 
side, and fasten securely. 



SPLIT SEAMS 

If possible, stitch seam from wrong 
side by machine. In lined coats, seam 
is mended with an invisible stitch 
from right side. Insert needle 1" 
from beginning of split. (Knot is 
clipped when mending is finished.) 
On opposite edge of opening and di- 
rectly across, catch 2 or 3 threads on 
needle. Continue to catch 2 or 3 
threads alternately on either side of 
split (Fig. 12). Keep stitches very 
small. Pull thread up from time to 
time. Fasten off invisibly and run 
thread end on inside for 1" before 
clipping. 

LINGERIE STRAPS 

To prevent straps from breaking or 
being troublesome, make a band 1 y 2 " 
long of single crochet (use Clark's 
O.N.T. Mercerized thread doubled), 
of narrow tape, or of narrow bands 
of dress fabric. Sew one end to shoul- 
der seam half way between armhole 
and center of shoulder seam. Sew 
flat side of a small snap to free end, 
and other side of snap to shoulder 
seam directly over the top half of 
snap (Fig. 13). 

TURNING THE 
COLLAR AND CUEFS 
ON A MAN'S SHIRT 

Determine exact center of collar and 
neckband by folding them in half, 
matching edge to edge and point to 
point. Mark center of each with pin. 
On wrong side of collar run a basting 
thread down the center (Fig. 14). 
On inner side of neckband run a col- 
ored basting down the center (Fig. 
15). Remove collar from top of neck- 
band by ripping stitching carefully 
(Fig. 16). Pull out all thread ends. 
Press neckband (seams still turned 
in) and collar section well. Insert 
reversed collar in neckband, match- 
ing centers carefully. Pin from cen- 
ter out making same seam allow- 
ance as before. Do not stretch band 
or collar. Ease wherever necessary. 



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Baste both sides of neckband to col- 
lar along old stitching line (Fig. 17). 
Stitch by machine from inside around 
edge using a small stitch. 
Occasionally the collar facing varies 
slightly from the rest of the shirt m 
that it is cut on the opposite grain. 
This is scarcely noticeable when the 
shirt has been carefully laundered. 
It is practical to turn cuffs only when 
they fold back. Remove cuff by rip- 
ping stitching across top (Fig. 18). 
Press. Ease sleeve into turned cuff. 
Raste and stitch on outside. 

MEKDIXG TEAR§ 

General Directions ... For 

woolens, a thread of fabric drawn 
from the hem or side makes a neat 
and inconspicuous darn. Otherwise 
use Clark's O.N.T. and J. & P. Coats 
Mercerized Thread which comes in 
many shades so that it is easy to 
secure a matching color. Darn on 
right side. Do not make a knot as 
there is no strain on material. 

Straight Tear ... To begin, 
bring thread through from wrong 




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side of garment, leaving an end of 
6" on wrong side, about %" beyond 
end of tear and a little to the right. 
Following the thread of goods, take 
a few rows of small running stitches 
back and forth. Do not darn too 
tightly but leave a very small loop 
at each turning. When you reach the 
tear, fit edges together and sew across 
opening. On one row make the stitch 
over tear and on next row under. 
Continue for about \%" beyond end. 
To finish, catch thread through 
stitches of last row and clip. Thread 
needle with 6" thread left hanging 
at beginning and catch it through 
stitches of at least one row. Clip 
closely (Fig. 19). 

Three Cornered Tear . . . Tear 
is both lengthwise and crosswise. 
Darn in same manner as for straight 
tear. Stitches run at right angles to 
opening. Regin at one end and darn 




one side completely. Then begin at 
other end and darn that side com- 
pletely. Stitches at corners thus over- 
lap and are strengthened (Fig. 20). 

Diagonal Tear ... In a diagonal 
tear both lengthwise and crosswise 
threads are cut. Darn with small run- 
ning stitches parallel to lengthwise 
thread, but in direction of tear. Over 
these stitches work another set at 
right angles to first (Fig. 21). 

Worn Plaee On Garment • * • 

Cut piece of material same as gar- 
ment just a little larger than worn 
place. Raste to wrong side under thin 
spot, and cover entire worn area as 
for darning a tear, taking stitches 
through both thicknesses of material. 
On wool material, if a similar piece 
of fabric is not available, baste a piece 
of net under worn spot and darn as 
for tear. 



PATCHES 



General Directions . . . When 
hole is large, and a darn would be 
too conspicuous and not strong 
enough, the hole is patched with 
material same as garment. Cut a 
piece from hem or seams to obtain 
matching patch. If necessary, fade 
patch to correspond by washing in 
soap suds and baking soda, rinsing 
well, and drying in the sun. 

II em in ed Patch ... Using 
threads of material as guide, cut 
away worn portion to make either a 



square or rectangle (Fig. 22). Cut 
patch 1 " larger on all sides than hole 
after edges have been straightened. 
Pin patch in place under hole, right 
side showing through. Threads in 
patch must run same way as those in 
garment, and any pattern should 
match exactly. On right side of gar- 
ment clip corners of hole diagonally 
about %"'. Turn in raw edges and 
baste to patch (Fig. 23). On wrong 
side of garment turn in raw edges 
of patch 14" and baste to garment 
(Fig, 24). Press. Stitch edges down 
by machine or hand hem (F:g. 25). 



Darned Patch ... Inconspicuous, 
used on woolens . . . Cut away worn 
portion as for hemmed patch. Cut 
patch 1" larger than hole. Do not clip 
corners of hole. Raw edges of the 
hole are basted to patch and then 
darned to patch with rows of small 
running stitches as in darn for 
straight tear. (Use thread drawn 
from hem or side.) Darn each side 
completely so that stitches overlap at 
corners (Fig. 26). Remove basting. 
Do not sew raw edges of patch to 
garment on wrong side. Finish these 
edges with overcast stitch (Fig. 27). 



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Overhand Patch ... Least 
noticeable (not very strong). 
Straighten hole as for hemmed patch. 
Clip corners diagonally for %" (Fig. 
28). Turn edges under as far as pos- 
sible. Baste. Press. Measure dimen- 
sions of hole with edges turned back. 
Carefully match patch and cut it % " 
larger than the hole on all sides. 
Turn in %" allowance on one side. 
Press down. Do same on 3 remaining 
sides. With patch flat, where creases 
come to a point, cut off triangle of 
goods (Fig. 29). Put patch directly 
under hole. It should fit exactly. Pin 
in place with pins at right angles to 
folded edges. Baste with small stitches 
at these points (Fig. 30). On wrong 
side overhand patch to garment with 
tiny stitches (Fig. 31). Overcast raw 
edges. Remove bastings. Press. 

Underarm Patch . . . Four seams 
meet at underarm. Cut away worn 
portion in a square, each corner of 
which comes at a seam line (Fig. 
32). Straighten edges of hole. Turn 
dress to wrong side. Rip seams about 
Y 2 ". Turn edges of hole back y 2 " and 
press (Fig. 33). Cut patch y 2 " larger 
all around than opening. Place patch 
over hole right side down. Allowing 
J /2 " for seam, baste edge of patch to 
edge of hole. Stitch on basting line 
(Fig. 34). Press seam open. Overcast 
raw edges. (Fig. 35) shows finished 
patch. 



Knitted Patch . . . Cut hole into 
a rectangle. At each corner slash by 
separating 3 stitches as shown in 
(Fig. 36). Fold the pieces at both 
sides of opening back to wrong side of 
sweater. Sew neatly in place with 
matching yarn (Fig. 37). Place the 
stitches at top of hole on a stitch 
holder or safety pin (Fig. 38). With 
a double-pointed steel knitting needle 
pick up the stitches at bottom of hole. 
Attach matching yarn at right side. 
Double over a short end of yarn and 
draw a loop through first stitch and 
proceed as in regular knitting. Work 
in stockinette st (k 1 row, p 1 row) 
until work reaches the top of the hole, 
ending with a k row. Break off yarn 
so that a 14" length is left. Thread a 
darning needle with this length. 
Place stitches on the stitch holder or 
safety pin on the second knitting 
needle. Weave the stitches on the two 
needles together as follows: 

1. Turn the work and hold it so that 
the two knitting needles have stitches 
even and parallel, and the strand of 
yarn is at the end of back needle. 

2. Insert darning needle as if to p in 
first stitch of front needle. Draw 
through the yarn, leaving stitch on 
front needle. 

3. Insert darning needle as if to k in 
the first stitch of back needle. Draw 
yarn through, leaving stitch on back 
needle, 

4. Insert darning needle as if to k in 
first stitch of front needle (same 
stitch as before), and slip this stitch 
off the front needle. Insert darning 
needle in next stitch of front needle 



as if to p, draw yarn through, but 
leave the stitch on front needle. 

5. Insert darning needle as if to p in 
first stitch on back needle, and slip 
this stitch off. Insert darning needle 
in next stitch on back needle as if to 
k, draw yarn through but leave this 
stitch on needle. 

6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until all 
stitches are worked off. 

Sew side edges neatly to the side 
edges of rectangle on wrong side of 
hole. Darn in loose end at beginning 
of work. Press through a damp cloth. 

Abbreviations 

k . . , knit p . . . purl 

st . . , stitch 

Appliqne for Patches . . . Holes 
may be cleverly hidden by means of 
applique. Cut out flowers from printed 
fabric allowing %" edge all around. 
Run a loose machine stitch %" from 
raw edge. Pull up stitching and raw 
edge will turn under. Baste around 
turned edge. Press. Slip stitch (see 
p. 49) in place with small invisible 
stitches. Original pattern or commer- 
cial transfers may also be used. 

Embroidery for Patches . . . 

Embroidery may also be used to con- 
ceal tears and darns. Use commercial 
transfer patterns or plan simple em- 
broidery which needs no pattern 
(monograms, saddle-stitching, lazy- 
daisy, cross stitch) . 







For service—Use J. & P. Coats— Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 




^ 




ALTERATIONS AND RESTYLING 

For external use only: a thimbleful of dressmakers' tricks 
guaranteed to take the years off your clothes in the twinkling 
of a needle's eye. Nobody will ever guess the age of your coat 
if its hem swings straight and true, or dream your dress isn't 
this year's vintage if its shoulders are smooth, its collar trim. 
Follow these simple as ABC directions and watch your tired 
wardrobe put on new airs, snap to attention like brave and 
pretty soldiers for service. 



Alteration frequently hwolves only a 
few simple adjustments. Dresses, skirts, 
and coats may need hems or sleeves 
lengthened or shortened, "bagginess" 
eliminated at the back, a waist taken 
in, a new lining. 

Occasionally alteration entails a 
change of one or two objectionable fea- 
tures so as to restyle the garment. In 
this case there are a few important 
considerations: 

1. Is the original fabric good enough 
to survive the change? 

2. Is the color becoming? If not, can it 
be dyed? 

3. Is the style adaptable to the change ? 



DRESS PROBLEMS 



The general rules for this kind of 
alteration are as follows: 

1. To make desired changes use a 
commercial pattern, chosen for de- 
sired new lines, but keeping in 
mind the existing lines of the 
garment. 

2. Parts to be recut are ripped flat, 
pressed and treated as new fabric. 

3. Contrasting fabric is chosen so that 
it is suitable to the existing gar- 
ment. Do not attempt to match 
weaves. Rather choose a plain con- 
trast. The same applies to colors 
and prints. 



LENGTH OF DRESS 





How to Alter Hems 

1. Take out old hem, take off old seam binding 
to use again. Press out crease mark from 
wrong side through a damp cloth. Put on gar- 
ment, wearing shoes of a suitable heel height. 

2. Mark at desired hemline by having someone 
measure the distance from floor with a yard- 
stick and mark it at short intervals around 
bottom of skirt by inserting pins parallel to 
floor (Fig. 1), or use a commercial skirt marker 
set at proper height. 

3. Turn up hem at new line by folding fabric 
at pin line and placing pins at right angles to 
fold (Fig. 2). Baste close to fold. Press on 
wrong side. 

4. Trim to desired width, using a gauge (Fig. 
3). Two inches is an average finished width, 
but very full skirts should have narrower hems. 

5. Finish hem suitably. 

* For a skirt the procedure is the same as that 
outlined above. 

Hem Finishes 

1, For cottons, rayons, and other washables 




where skirt is not too full, turn in raw edge 
1 / 4" and machine stitch close to edge. Press, 
pin, and slip stitch (see p. 49). 

2. For rayons, woolens, and skirts with some 
fullness, gather fullness to fit hemline by run- 
ning a loose machine stitch % " from edge, and 
pulling this up to fit. Match seams, spreading 
fullness evenly into the places where it wants 
to fall naturally, following the grain. Shrink 
out excess fullness by pressing through a damp 
cloth. Machine stitch seam binding or cotton 
bias trim along gathering line. Slip stitch. 

3. For heavy firmly woven woolens, it is suffi- 
cient to pink (see p. 48) the hem edge, run a 
machine stitching close to the edge, and catch 
stitch in place (see p. 49). 

* For a skirt the procedure is the same as that 
outlined above. 

Hint: When lengthening the skirt, if, after 
cleaning and pressing, the line of the former 
hem persists in showing, choose a mercerized 
thread of matching color and machine stitch 
over the mark. 



SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ADJUSTING LENGTH OF DRESS 



Shortening a Dress from 
Waistline (When Lower 
Edge Cannot Be Altered) 

1. Determine how many inches you 
wish to shorten dress (see p. 9), 
Measure desired number of inches 
down from waistline all around skirt 
and mark with pins. Baste around 
marked line. 

2. Rip skirt from waist and rip 
placket from skirt. Mark waistline 
on waist with basting. Mark center 
back and center front of waist and 
skirt. Rip side seams of skirt to bast- 
ing line. 

3. Turn under top of skirt at basting 
line, and matching center points, pin 
to waist at waistline, 

4. Put on dress and check evenness 
of hemline. Take up or let down as 
necessary by turning under more or 
less around top of skirt. 

5. Fit side seams. 

6. Remove dress. Mark fold at top of 
skirt and new side seam lines. 

7. Remove skirt and trim top edge 
%" above marking line. Baste and 
stitch side seams along marking lines, 
graduating into old seams. 

8. Rip old seams, press open, trim 
to %". 

9. Turn in top edge of skirt along 
marking line. Matching centers and 
side seams, pin skirt to waistline. 
Stitch, press, insert placket. 



* For a skirt, rip off belt and follow 
above procedure. 

Shortening a Full Length 
Skirt 

1. Hem is marked with chalk or pen- 
cil 14" below point where dress 
touches floor, when it is hanging 
straight. Cut off on this line. 

2. Stitch back Vs" by machine. Turn 
up edge another Y$" and slip stitch 
(see p. 49) . Or hem may be roll 
hemmed by hand (see p. 49). Press. 

Faeed Hem on a Flared 
Skirt 

1. When there is not enough fabric 
to turn up, proceed as in steps 1 and 2 
of How To Alter Hems. Baste around 
pin line. Cut off y^" below basting 
line. 

2. Measure distance around bottom 
of skirt. 

3. For facing, cut bias strips (see p. 
49) 3 inches wide, of a fabric similar 
to that in dress. 

4. Sew enough pieces together so 
that strip equals width at bottom of 
skirt. 

5. Fit strip to lower edge of garment 
right sides together and baste. Join 
ends. 

6. Stitch around bottom edge taking 

W ■ 
open. 



7. Fold facing back to wrong side 
along seamline. Baste and press. 

8. Finish hem suitably (see Hem 
Finishes under How To Alter Herns 
p. 9). 

* For a skirt, follow the above pro- 
cedure. 

Faced Hem on a 
Straight Skirt 

Cut a straight strip for facing long 
enough to equal measurement around 
bottom of skirt and proceed as for 
Faced Hem On A Flared Skirt. 

* For a skirt follow the above pro- 
cedure. 

Other Suggestions For 
Lengthening a Dress 

A Folded Band of Contrasting Color 
may be added to a dirndl type of 
skirt. The band when finished should 
be about 5" for a child and 7" for an 
adult. Strips of contrasting material 
cut either 11" or 15" wide allow for 
a double fold and a % hich seam 
allowance. 

A Concealed Piecing at Top of Skirt 
will serve to lengthen skirt. Conceal 
piecing with a contrasting peplum, 
and remake front of dress in con- 
trasting fabric also, so that peplum 
will be part of dress and not obvi- 
ously a cover up (Fig. A). 




back, 

wrong 
side 

e 


in 

1 
It 

1 


front 



WAISTLINE 

Waistline Too Low 

1. Put on dress and mark correct waistline 
with pins. Baste around pin line. 

2. Rip out placket and rip skirt from waist. 

3. Mark center front and center back of skirt 
and waist. 

4. Pin skirt to correct waistline marking, 
matching centers and side seams. 

5. Baste, stitch skirt to waist, press, insert 
placket. 

Dress Too Large at Waistline 

1. Take out zipper and side seams. Press out 
folds. Refit both side seams by pinning in ex- 
cess fullness evenly on sides (Fig. 4). Mark 
new seam lines on back and front with pins 
placed parallel to seam. Run basting along pin 
line. Place two basting lines together and sew 
right side seam. In same manner, sew left side 








front 
-clip 



i 

front ; j 


back. 








seam above and below placket opening (length 
of zipper teeth) . 

2. At front of placket opening, baste seam al- 
lowance back along marking line. 

3. At back of placket opening, fold seam al- 
lowance i/g" away from seam line. Continue 
fold %" above and below opening (Fig. 5). 
Baste. Press both edges. 

4. Pin and baste back edge of opening to zip- 
per tape close to metal. Ease fabric to tape so 
that metal will lie flat. Stitch close to edge 
with cording foot. Extend stitching beyond 
opening to end of tape at both ends (Fig. 6). 
At ends of tape, clip back seam allowance into 
seam (Fig. 7), so that it will lie flat. On right 
side, pin front edge of placket to seam line and 
baste firmly. Stitch front of placket to tape on 
right side using a cording foot. Make allow- 
ance for the extra width of the zipper slider 
and continue stitching at that width (Fig. 8). 
* For a skirt follow the same procedure as 
above except that the belt is ripped off first, 
and applied again after zipper has been in- 
serted. Excess length on belt is taken off at 
back of opening. 

Note: Most difficulty in putting in zippers may 
be avoided by using a cording foot on the ma- 
chine in place of the regular presser foot. This 
is a special foot which may be purchased at 
very small cost. 



I0« 



Bagginess at Back of Skirt of Dress 

1. Take out back waistline seam and side 
seams of skirt. Press out folds. 

2. Raise back of skirt just enough to bring side 
seams into line (J^" to %"). Refit side seams. 
Even hemline. 

* For a skirt, take off belt across back and fol- 
low the above procedure. 

SLEEVES 
Sleeves Out of Bate 

1. Take out sleeves and remake. 

a. Take out sleeves, open up flat, press, and 
recut from desired pattern. Match "straight 
of goods" marking carefully to lengthwise 
thread of sleeves. Put in recut sleeves. 

b. Proper sleeve padding is important. Cut a 
6" square of fabric and fold diagonally. Pad 
to y^' thick at center fold, graduating to 
nothing at three points. Bind edges. Sew pad 

to shoulder seam, allowing fold edge to ex- 
tend about %." beyond armhole into top of 
sleeve. 

2. Add contrasting yoke and sleeves, if sleeves 
and shoulders are too hopelessly out of date 
(Fig. B). 

Sleeves Worn Out at the Elbow 

Cut off sleeve just above wx>rn place. Turn 
under desired length on one sleeve and pin. 
Try on to check for length and evenness (Fig. 
9). 

1. For a plain hem, baste around turned edge. 
Fold sleeve in half on seam, pinning this fold, 
and also pinning front and back of armhole 
seam together. Pin other sleeve the same way 
and match two sleeves to get correct line (Fig. 
10). Baste. Press. Trim h«ms to 1". To fit 
sleeve to arm, take out excess in sleeve seam. 
Apply seam binding to edges and slip stitch 
(see p. 49). 

2. For at" turn-up cuff on a straight sleeve, 
mark desired finished line with a basting at 
fold (Fig. 11). Measure and mark around 
sleeve, 1" down from this line. Determine new 
line on other sleeve as above. Turn up on 
lower line, baste, press. Trim hem to 1 y 2 " and 
finish as before. Press cuff back on original 
marking line. 



NECKLINE 

Neckline Is Unbecoming 

1. Take off old neckline finish. Press carefully. 
Run a machine stitch close to edge to prevent 
stretching. By pulling up this stitching slightly, 
a neckline which has been stretched may be 
eased in. 

2. Select a pattern with desired neckline. Cut 
new line from this pattern, folding garment 
carefully at center front and center back be- 
fore pinning on pattern. Apply suitable finish 
as suggested in pattern. 

RESTYLING PROBLEMS 

Dress Too Small 

Insert contrasting panel in front. Choose a 
suitable pattern and re-cut dress and new 
panel from it (Fig. C). 

Skirt of Dress Too Narrow 

1. Take off old skirt at waistline, or cut off 3 
to 5 inches below waistline, depending on style 
of dress. (If skirt is cut off below waistline, 
experiment with contrasting fabric to deter- 
mine the most becoming line). 

2. Add new skirt in contrasting fabric cut from 
a commercial pattern chosen to fit in with 
style of dress (Fig. D). Full gathered skirts 
accentuate size, as do bold contrasts. Subtle 
related colors, and dull, dark colors tend to 
decrease size. 

Waist or Skirt of Dress Out of Date 

Sometimes the skirt of a dress is entirely good 
and the waist is out of date or vice versa. Make 
the other half in contrast. This is especially 
good on evening dresses (Fig. E). Separate 
jackets and skirts are often possible. Bright 
striped jerkins can transform plain dresses 
(Fig. F). 

SKIRT PROBLEMS 

Most skirt problems can be handled in the 
same manner as dresses. In any section a * 
indicates special recommendations for skirts. 









ii 



I OAT PROBLEMS 




Mow to Alter the 
Hem of a Coat 

1. Rip lining from facing on inside of coat far 
enough to allow you to work comfortably. 
Free lining from hem of coat and take out 
both hems. Put on coat. 

2. Determine new hemline in same manner 
as for dress (see p. 9). Mark new length on 
facing also. 

3. Turn up hem on coat and facing at new 
line by folding fabric at pin line and placing 
pins at right angles to fold (see p. 9). Baste 
close to fold. Press on wrong side. 

4. Trim to l 1 /^", using a gauge. Shrink out 
excess fullness (see p. 9, Hern Finishes 2). 
Finish raw edges by pinking, running a ma- 
chine stitching close to edge, and catch stitch- 
ing in place (see p. 49). Or machine stitch 
binding on hem edge and blind hem (Fig. 12). 

5. To finish lining: Put coat on and pin lining 
to coat around bottom of coat about 4" above 
hem. Baste lining to coat around this line. 
Turn up hem of lining one inch shorter than 
hem of coat, using coat hem as a guide. Baste. 
Press. Blind hem lining separately, making a 



1" hem (Fig. 12). Fold facing back in place. 
On a coat which you do not expect to lengthen 
again, hem of facing is trimmed to %" and 
slip stitched to lower edge of coat. (Do not trim 
facing on children's clothes.) Slip stitch lining 
to facing where it was ripped. Fasten lining 
to hem at each seam with French tacks' (Fig. 
13). French tacks are made like buttonhole 
loops (see p. 49). 

How to Shorten 
Sleeve of Coat 

1. Rip lining free from fabric at bottom of 
sleeves and take out any hems. Press out folds. 

2. Adjust coat sleeves to desired length. Pin. 

3. Try on to check evenness. Baste turning. 
Press, 

4. Trim hem evenly, leaving not more than 
2". Catch stitch in place (see p. 49). 

5. Put coat on, adjust sleeve lining, and pin 
to lining at several points, about 3" from bot- 
tom of sleeve. Baste lining to sleeve at this 
point. 

6. Turn up lining even with hem of sleeve, 
baste. Set lining edge y 2 " up from sleeve edge 
and slip stitch to sleeve (Fig. 14). 



How to Line a Coat 

Linings may be made of silk, rayon, 
or cotton, but a very durable fabric 
is rayon twill. For an average length 
of coat, buy, in 39" fabric, twice the 
length of garment plus about 12 
inches for hems. Allow a little more 
or less according to width of fabric. 

Cutting 

1. Do not wait until lining is too 
badly worn since it is necessary to 
use it as a pattern. 

2. Before ripping out make a cross 
stitch to mark (a) where sleeve joins 
shoulder seam, (b) about midpoint 
on back and front of sleeve, (c) cor- 
responding places on armhole, (d) 
where dart comes at front shoulder. 

3. Rip lining out and press to use as 
pattern. Fold back in half on length, 
using this portion as a pattern. Use 
one side of front and one sleeve (one 
of each piece if there are two pieces). 
By using the old lining pieces as pat- 
tei-ns, seam allowances and center 
back pleat are provided for. Be care- 
ful to cut opposite sleeves. This is 
best done by placing same sides of 
material together when cutting. 
When cutting, see that grain line is 
observed (see p. 48). 

4. Cut fabric and make marks to 
correspond with old lining. Seam 
allowances are indicated by stitching 
lines on old lining. 



5. Baste and stitch seams of sleeves 
and body of lining with the excep- 
tion of the shoulder seams. Press 
open. 

The Body of The Coat 

6. Lay coat on table and put in lin- 
ing wrong side to wrong side. Pin at 
underarm seams. Tack seam to seam 
from underarm to hip, using long 
stitches and working on wrong side. 

7. Pin lining to front armhole seam 
(clipping, if necessary) and across 
front shoulder, pinning in dart as in- 
dicated. Ease lining up, so that it 
lies flat. 

8. Pin lining to back armhole. Turn 
in seam allowance across back shoul- 
der and baste. Pin fold edge over 
front. Baste around armhole and 
across shoulder. 

9. At back neckline about one inch 
below seam allowance, pin from each 
side toward center back so that excess 
fullness becomes a pleat at center 
back. Ease lining up so that it lies 
flat. Turn in seam allowance. Pin 
and baste. 

10. Turn in seam allowance on 
front. Pin and baste to front facings 
making sure that fabric lies flat and 
smooth. 

11. Try on coat to make sure that 
lining does not draw. If it does, let 
out wherever necessary. 



12. Catch stitch (see p. 49) front 
darts and back pleat for a few inches 
from the top. The back pleat is also 
caught at the waist. 

13. Blind hem stitch (see p. 49) 
across shoulders. Begin 4" above hem 
on one side and blind hem stitch lin- 
ing to front and neckline facings 
around to 4" from hem on other side. 

14. Finish hem and lining by follow- 
ing directions on How To Alter Hem 
of Coat from step 2 on. 

On coat of suit, the lining is at- 
tached at lower edge. Turn up lining 
even with hem. Trim to y 2 inch. Set 
lining edge y 2 " up from bottom 
edge, and slip stitch (see p. 49). 

Sleeve 

Put sleeve lining in coat sleeve wrong 
sides together and match marking on 
sleeves to markings at armholes. 
Turn under seam allowance between 
the two marked points at underarm. 
Pin over armhole and baste. Match 
marked point at top of sleeve to 
shoulder seam. Turn in seam allow- 
ance, pin over armhole, easing in full- 
ness to fit. Blind hem stitch around 
entire armhole. Try on coat. Pin 
sleeve to lining at several points, 3" 
from bottom of sleeve. Baste lining to 
sleeve at this point. Turn up lining 
even with hem of sleeve, baste. Set 
lining edge y 2 " up from sleeve edge 
and slip stitch to sleeve (Fig. 14). 



For service— Use J. & P. Coats— Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 



%m^ / 4^ / M0 



^ 





Clothes may make the woman but nowa- 
days there's no doubt that accessories make the 
clothes. It's no trick at all for a dress to have nine 
lives. You can give last year's dress a new lease on 
life, make every costume pay extra dividends with 
a little needle and thread trickery. 
At 9 a.m. a simple crepe dress looks trim and business-like 
with neat white collar and cuffs. At 9 p.m. the same dress, 
glamorized with a frothy dickey, a new belt, a gay little 
hat, may on occasion wear a fresh-as-paint party face. 
Many a woman with a well-deserved reputation for chic 
has only a few basic costumes on which she 
n has learned to ring endless changes. It's good 

fashion sense and smart dollars and cents to 
s-t-r-e-t-c-h your wardrobe with a versa- 
tile collection of easy-to-make accessories. 

U^jr^-^ A polka-dotted hat and bag, a 
pair of red gloves and a matching calot 
or an inch of scarlet flounce peeping out 
from the bottom of a skirt; a necklace and 
earrings of bright crocheted stars; a set of 
buttons salvaged from a bureau drawer or 
made with a few bits of odd yarn 
change a dress so your best friend 
couldn't recognize it. 







«Mjk%^ 



IT'S A FRAME UP 

TO MAKE YOU PRETTIER 




Left: 

One Vestee with 
three jabots that but- 
ton on. It's that easy 
to do a quick change. 




•14 




I. Pointed Collar. 2- Square Collar. 3. Vestee 
with Three Jabots: A. Band with Ruffle. B. Circle 
Jabot. C. Folded Circle Jabot. 4. Scalloped Peter 
Pan Collar. 5. Bias Band Collar with Ruffle.* 
6. Button-On Collar with Crocheted Edging and 
Insertion No. 104. 7 A. V-Necked Collar with 
Frilly Crocheted Edging No. 100. 7B. V-Necked 
Collar with Crocheted Medallion Trim No. 102. 
7€. V-Necked Notched Collar. 8A. Regulation 
Elastic Bottom Dickey. 8B. Band Bottom Dickey. 
8C. Vest Bottom Dickey. 9. Short Dickey. 
10. Rever Collar with Ruffled Edging. 



6 



Edgings and Medallions 
of all kinds to trim any of 
the collars and dickeys. 
Below, 101 (top) and 103. 




Directions far Making All Dickeys and Collars Begin on Next Page 



15- 




Illustrations on pages 14 and 15. 



1. Pointed Collar 

(Scraps of fabric) 

1. Cut 2 Collar pieces from Pattern 
No. 1 on p. 23. 

2. Stitch Collar pieces together 
around outer edge. Trim seams to 
V4", turn, baste around turned edge. 
Press. 

3. Finish neck edge with bias bind- 
ing (see p. 49). 

2. Square Collar 

(Scraps of fabric) 

1. Cut 2 Collar pieces from Pattern 
No. 2 on p. 23. 

2. Stitch Collar pieces together 
around entire outer edge, leaving a 
4" opening on neck edge to turn. 
Trim seams to %,'\ turn Collar right 
side out through opening, baste 
around turned edge. Press. 

3. Turn under Y4" along each side 
of opening and slip stitch (see p. 49) 
edges together. 

3. Vestee with 3 Jabots 

(1%, yds. fabric, 14" elastic, 8 pearl 
buttons, \%" diameter) 

1. Cut Vestee from Pattern No. 3 on 
p. 23. 

2. Stitch shoulder darts by bringing 
dotted lines together. Slash dart 
through center. Press open. 

3. Finish entire outer edge and back 
opening of Vestee with narrow ma- 
chine hem. 

4. Finish neck edge with narrow bias 
binding of same fabric (see p. 49). 

5. Sew 5 buttons at 2" intervals 
down center front. 

6. Make thread loop (see p. 49) at 
top of right center edge of back open- 
ing and 2 more at 1" intervals. Sew 
buttons on left edge to correspond. 

7. Sew elastic to sides of Vestee at 
waistline to hold Vestee in place. 

A — Band with Ruffle ... 1. Cut 2 
Band pieces from Pattern No. 3-A 
and 1 Ruffle from Pattern No. 3-B 
both on p. 23. 

2. Turn, baste, and press %" all 
around both Band pieces. To turn 
around curved end easily, run a loose 
machine stitch around curve close to 
edge. Pull stitching up slightly and 
edge will turn under. 

3. Roll hem (see p. 49) entire outer 
edge and ends of Ruffle. 

4. Gather (see p. 48) inner edge of 
Ruffle to 18". Match center of Ruf- 
fle (on gathering line) to center of 
Band (at rounded end). Match end 
of Ruffle to end of Band. Top stitch 
(see p. 48) Band to Ruffle. 



5. Place second Band piece over first 
on wrong side and slip stitch (see p. 
49) into place. 

6. Make worked buttonhole (see p. 
49) to fit button on Vestee about y 4 " 
from straight end of Band. Make 3 
more buttonholes so that tops of but- 
tonholes are 2" apart. 

B — Circle Jabot ... 1. According to 
Fig. 1 cut Jabot. 

2. Face two-inch tab at bottom of 
Jabot taking \\" seams around edge. 

3. Finish entire outer edge of Jabot, 
including two ties with narrow roll 
hem (see p. 49). 

4. Make worked buttonhole (see p. 
49) to fit button on Vestee, close to 
slash at center of circle. Make 4 
more buttonholes so that tops of but- 
tonholes are 2" apart (Fig. 1). 



© 




C — Folded Circle Jabot ... 1. Ac- 
cording to Fig. 2 cut Jabot. 

2. Roll hem (see p. 49) all around. 

3. Make worked buttonhole (see p. 
49) to fit button on Vestee as indi- 
cated on pattern. 




4. Scalloped Peter Pan 
Collar 

(Scraps of linen and organdie) 

1. Cut 2 Collar pieces of linen from 
Pattern No. 4 on p. 23. Mark scallops 
evenly around Collar J^" in from 
edge, using a circle the size of a 
quarter. 

2. Follow step 2 under Pointed Col- 
lar No. 1 above. 

3. Cut a bias strip (see p. 49) of or- 
gandie 2" wide. Fold in half length- 
wise and overcast (see p. 48) to edge 
of Collar under scallops. 

4. Finish neck edge with bias bind- 
ing (see p. 49). 



5. Bias Band 
Collar With 
Ruffle 

(Scraps of fabric) 

1. Cut a bias strip (see p. 49) Zy%" 
wide and 28" long. Fold in half 
lengthwise and trim ends as in Fig. 3. 
Cut two pieces for Ruffles each 30" 
long and 4" wide at one end, sloping 
to 3" wide at other end, 

2. Roll hem (see p. 49) ends and 
straight edges of Ruffles. 

3. Gather (see p. 48) raw edge to 10". 

4. Starting at ends, stitch Ruffles to 
raw edge of folded bias strip, contin- 
uing stitching across center of strip 
(Fig. 3). Trim seam to %" . 

5. Finish entire edge with bias bind- 
ing (see p. 49). 

0. Button-On Collar With 
Crocheted Edging and In- 
sertion — 10 1 

(Crochet Directions on p. 22.) 
(Scraps of fabric) 

1. Cut 4 Collar pieces from Pattern 
No. 6- A on p. 23. Cut from double 
fabric (right sides together). Cut 2 
pieces from Pattern No. 6-B on p. 23. 

2. Stitch two A pieces together 
around outer edges. Repeat with 
other two. Trim seam to *4", turn, 
baste around turned edge. Press. 

3. Roll hem (see p. 49) entire outer 
edge of both B pieces. 

4. Whip (see p. 49) crocheted inser- 
tion to lower edge of A. 

5. Whip opposite edge of insertion to 
circular edge of B, 

6. Whip edging to outer and lower 
edge of B. 

7. Finish neck edge and connect two 
collars with a 24" piece of bias bind- 
ing (see p. 49). 

8. Make 5 buttonholes (see p. 49) in 
bias band at center, ends, and in be 
tween. Attach buttons to garment. 

7, A, B, C. V-Necked Collar 

0/2 yd. fabric) 

1. Cut 2 Collar pieces (either rounded 
or notched according to style desired) 
from Pattern No. 7 on p. 23. 

2. Follow steps 2 and 3 under Square 
Collar No. 2 above. 

8-A. Regulation Elastic 
Bottom IMekey 

(1 yd. fabric, 4 buttons %" size, 9" 

elastic) 
1. Cut 2 Fronts, 1 Back, 2 Pointed 



For service — Use J. & P. Coats — Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 



Collars, 2 Facings (Front as far as 
cut-off line) from No. 8 Patterns on 
p. 23. 

2. Mark buttonholes (%" long and 
3" apart) as indicated, on outside of 
right Front by taking small stitches 
with colored thread. 

3. Stitch Fronts to Back along shoul- 
ders. 

4. Stitch Collar pieces together 
around outer edge. Trim seam to x /%\ 
turn Collar, baste around turned 
edge. Press. 

5. Stitch Collar to neck edge (under 
side of Collar to right side of Dickey) . 

6. Machine back stitch (see p. 48) 
inner (sloping) and shoulder edges 
of Facings. 

7. Stitch Facings to center Front 
edges. Continue stitching Facing 
over Collar around neck edge to end 
of Facing. 

8. Stitch bias binding (see p. 49) 
along seam across back of neck be- 
tween Facings. 

9. Trim neck edge and front seams 
to %". Turn Facing to inside, baste 
turned edges. Press. 

10. Slip stitch (see p. 49) bias bind- 
ing down across back of neck. Slip 
stitch Facing to shoulder seam. 

11. Cut buttonholes through both 
thicknesses and finish with button- 
hole stitch (see p. 49). 

12. Sew buttons on left Front to cor- 
respond to buttonholes. 

13. Finish sides of Dickey with nar- 
row machine hem. 

14. Make V2" machine hem along 
lower edges. Join Back and Front at 
sides by inserting 4 1 /a" pieces of 
elastic in hems. 

8-B. Band Bottom Dickey 

(1 yd. fabric, 7 buttons — Y 2 " size) 

1. Cut 2 Fronts and 1 Back (cutting 
off at waistline on dotted line as 
indicated), 2 Round Collars, 2 Fac- 
ings (Front as far as cut-off line) 
from No. 8 Patterns on p. 23. Cut 2 
Waistband pieces each 7" wide by 
17" long. 

2. Follow steps 2 through 13 under 
Regulation Dickey 8-A above. 

3. Turn under and press J4" around 
all sides of Waistband pieces. Fold in 
half lengthwise and mark center. On 
Fronts, 2" in from sides, gather (see 
p. 48) 3" sections to 2" (Fig. 4). 
Insert Front and Back in each band, 
matching centers as shown. Baste all 
around band. Stitch (Fig. 4) through 

all thicknesses. 



ijjj^ 



4. Make 2 buttonholes (see p. 49) 
on front ends of band and sew but- 
tons on back. 

8-C. Vest Bottom Dickey 

(1 yd. f abide, 4 buttons — y 2 " size, 
9" elastic, 1 snap) 

1. Cut 2 Fronts (cutting off bottom 
in points as indicated), 1 Back, 2 
Facings (Front as far as cut-off line) 
from No. 8 Patterns on p. 23. Cut a 
bias band 3" wide x 40" long for 
neck finish (see p. 49). 

2. Follow steps 2, 3, and 6 under 
Regulation Dickey 8-A above. 

3. Stitch Facings to center Front and 
lower pointed edges. Turn corner at 
neck edge and continue stitching Fac- 
ing around neck for 1". Clip seam 
allowance at end of stitching. 

4. Trim this seam to %>", turn Fac- 
ing to inside, baste turned edge, press. 

5. Fold bias band in half lengthwise 
(right side inside) and stitch across 
ends and down sides for 11". Clip in 
to seam at end of stitching. Trim 
seams to Ys'\ turn to right side and 
baste turned edges, press. 

6. Stitch one free edge of opening in 
band around neck edge (right sides 
together) . Finished ends of band 
should come to edge of 1" finished 
section at center front of neck edge. 

7. Turn in other edge of band y 2 " 
and slip stitch (see p. 49) to seam 
around inside of neck. 

8. Follow steps 1 1 to 1 3 under Regu- 
lation Dickey 8-A above. 

9. Join Back and Front at sides with 
4!/2 " pieces of elastic. Try on Dickey 
and if necessary take two small darts 
at waistline in Fronts for better fit. 

9. Short Dickey 

(Y 2 yd. fabric, 3 buttons^ 1 /^ " size) 

1. Cut 2 Fronts, 1 Back. 2 Facings 
(Front as far as cut-off line) and 2 
Collars from No. 9 Patterns on p. 23. 

2. Follow steps 3 to 10 under Regu- 
lation Dickey 8-A above. 

3. Make thread loop (see p. 49) at 
top of right center edge and twT> more 
at 2" intervals below. Sew buttons on 
left center edge to correspond. 

4. Finish entire outer edge of Dickey 
with narrow machine hem. 

10. Bever Collar With 
Burned Edging 

(Scraps of fabric) 

1. Cut 4 Collar pieces from Pattern 
No. 10 on p. 23. Cut from double fab- 
ric (right side together). Cut 2 
straight strips each 2" wide and 36" 
long for Ruffling. 

2. Hand roll hem (see p. 49) ends 
and one side of each Ruffle. Gather 
(see p. 48) to 12". 



3. Stitch a strip to outer edge of one 
right and one left rever. Place right 
sides together, edge to edge, leaving 
1 2 " at each end free of ruffling. Stitch 
on y 2 " gathering line. 

4. Place right sides of other two 
Collar pieces against ruffling just 
stitched. Stitch together on previous 
stitching line. Turn. Baste turned 
edges flat. Press. 

5. Finish neck edge with bias binding. 

IOO— Frilly Edging 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T or J. & P. Coats Mer- 
cerized Crochet, size 50, 2 balls. 
Steel crochet Hook No. 12. 

Make a chain slightly longer than 
the measurement of the outside edge 
of collar, 1st row: S c in 6th ch from 
hook. * ch 5, skip 1 ch, s c in next ch. 
Repeat from * across. Ch 5, turn. 2nd 
to 4th rows incl: * S c in next loop, 
ch 5. Repeat from * across to within 
last loop, ch 3, tr in last loop. Ch 5. 
turn, but ch 7 to turn at end of 4th 
row. 5th row: * S c in next loop, ch 
7. Repeat from * across, ending with 
ch 4. tr in last loop. Ch 7, turn. Re- 
peat the last row until piece measures 
2 inches in all, adding 1 ch in each 
loop every other row. Fasten off. 
Starch lightly, press and whip (see 
p. 49) to outside edge of collar. 

IOI— Motif Collar Edging 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T or J. & P. Coats Mer- 
cerized Crochet, size 30, 1 ball. 

Steel crochet Hook No. 11. 

1st MOTIF . . . Ch 9. Join with si st 
to form ring. 1st rnd: Ch 4 (to count 
as tr), 23 tr in ring. Join with si st 
in 4th st of 1st ch made. 2nd rnd: 
Ch 1, s c in same place as si st, * ch 5. 
s c in 4th ch from hook, ch 1, skip 2 
tr, tr in next tr, ch 5, s c in 4th ch 
from hook, ch 1, tr in same place as 
last tr, ch 5, s c in 4th ch from hook, 
ch 1, skip 2 tr, s c in next tr. Repeat 
from * around. Join with si st in 1st 
s c made. 

2nd MOTIF . . . Work as for 1st 
Motif until 1st rnd is complete. 2nd 
rnd; Ch 1, s c in same place as si st, 
ch 5, s c in 4th ch from hook, ch 1. 
skip 2 tr, tr in next tr, ch 3, drop 
loop from hook, insert hook in center 
p on a corner of 1st Motif, draw 
dropped loop through, ch 2, s c in 
2nd st of last ch-3, ch 1, tr in same 
place as last tr. Complete rnd as on 
2nd rnd of 1st Motif (no more join- 
ings). Fasten off. 

Continue thus joining motifs as 
2nd was joined to 1st until piece is 
desired length. Fasten off. 
Whip (see p. 49) to edge of collar. 

(Cont'd on page 22) 



Crochet abbreviations., page 5© 



17- 




A BALL OF YARN 

A SCRAP OF FELT 
AND YOU . . . 

LOOKING LIKE 



12. Fabric Covered Crino- 
line Sailor. 

13. Fabric Covered Crino- 
line Calot. 

14. Bow Calot with Back 
Ruffle and Matching Bag. 

15. Knotted Cap and Draw- 
string Bag. 




16. Lacy Crochet Brimmed Sailor 
and Crochet Trimmed Collar. IT. 
Triple Thread Snood. 1U. Pop- 
corn Calot. 19. Frill Pompadour 
Hat. 20. Open Crown Double 
Crochet Calot. 21. Closed Crown 
Single Crochet Calot. 22. Crochet 
Trimmed Felt Hat. 23. Made 
Over Visor Cap. 




Directions For Making All Hats 
Begin On Next Page 

21 
22 




witm 




Illustrations on pages 18 and 19. 



11— Pillbox 

(See photo on p. 32, No. 2) 
(1 crinoline pillbox frame, Ya- yd. 
fabric, % yd. l /%" belting ribbon.) 
Fig. 1 — Mark center of length of 
crown, following grain of crinoline. 
Continue basting to outer edge. 
Fig. 2 — Measure length and width 
of crown, add 2". Cut rectangle of 
fabric to these dimensions, for top 
piece. Match center line of fabric 
to center line of hat. Pin. 





Fig. 3 — Hold fabric taut and smooth. 
Pin around top edge. Baste and back 
stitch (see p. 48) to sides of crown, 
Ys" below edge. Trim edge to Yk" • 
At sides, measure around widest part 
of hat, add 3". For width measure 
deepest part of side, add 3". Cut true 
bias strip to these dimensions (see 
p. 49). 

Fig. A — Divide length of strip in 
half. Match and pin center to center 
front of frame with top edge 1" 
above crown edge. Stretch fabric to 
lie taut. Pin all around top and bot- 
tom of side. To finish back, turn un- 
der edge of one end on diagonal line. 





Fig. 5 — Trim top and bottom edges 
to Yz "• Turn under top raw edge. Slip 
stitch (see p. 49) to crown. Turn 
bottom edge to wrong side. Baste. 




Fig. 6 — Making Sweatband — Damp- 
en belting. Shape with heated iron 
by stretching one edge with point 
of iron, all along length. Starting 
at center back inside of hat place 
stretched edge 1/16" from lower 
edge. Pin and baste all around. Over- 
hand stitch (see p. 50). Turn under 
end Yb" and catch to under piece of 
ribbon. 

12— Sailor 

(1 crinoline sailor frame, Yz yd. fab- 
ric, % yd. Yz" belting ribbon.) 
See Fig. 1 for marking frame. 
Measure length of crown, add 3". 
Cut square of fabric to this dimen- 
sion. Mark true bias (see p. 49). 
Fig. 7 — Match and pin bias line to 
center line of crown. Hold fabric 
taut and smooth. Pin around top 
edge. Baste and back stitch (see p. 
48) to sides of crown, Y%" below 
edge. Trim edge to *4". 
Fig. 8 — Turn hat upside down. Meas- 
ure length of hat brim, Add 4". Cut 
two squares of fabric to this dimen- 
sion. Mark true bias on squares. 




Fig. 9 — On one square find center 
of bias line. On line, to each side of 
center measure off Y% length of 
crown. Mark. From center point 
measure Yz width of crown. Mark. 
Join points to make a circle. Cut 
around circle Yz" t0 inside. 





Fig. 10 — Slip fabric over crown, right 
side up. Match bias line to guide line 
on brim. To fit fabric around crown, 
make small slashes all around cir- 
cular edge. Hold fabric taut and 
smooth. Pin all around edge. Baste. 
Back stitch. 




Fig, 1 1 — At outer edge of brim gent- 
ly stretch fabric taut and smooth. 
Pin Y4" apart. Trim excess to %". 
Turn to underside of brim. Baste. 
Overhand stitch (see p. 49). 
Fig. 12 — Place square on underside 
of brim, right side out. Match guide 
lines. Fit outer edge as in Fig. 11. 
Slash fabric covering up crown. Fit 
to inside of crown and finish as in 
Fig. 10. Trim outer edge to Y4" • 
Turn under so that finished edge is 
exactly on brim edge. Slip stitch 
(see p. 49). 




Fig. 13 — At sides measure around 
widest part of hat, add 3". For width 
measure deepest part of side, add 1", 
Cut true bias strip to these dimen- 
sions. Turn under one lengthwise 
edge Y2" '• Baste. Press. Match center 
of length to center front and place 
turned edge, right side out, over 
stitching line at bottom of crown. 
Blind tack at several points around. 
Finish back ends as in Fig. 4. Finish 
top edge as in Fig. 5. Apply sweat- 
band as in Fig, 6. Trim as desired. 

13— Calot 

(1 crinoline calot frame, Yz yd. fab- 
ric, % yd. Yz" belting ribbon, Ys 
yd. crinoline.) 
See Fig. 1 for marking frame. 
Measurements for center strip; Take 
length of crown from back to front 
through center, add 2". Width is 4". 



•20- 



For service — Use J. & P. Coats — Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 



Cut on true bias (see p. 49). Mark 
lengthwise center with basting. On 
both, lengthwise edges turn under 
1/4". Baste. Press. 

Fig. 14 — Match center line of fabric 
to center line of hat. Pin. Gently 
stretch and mold strip to fit shape. 
Pin at front and back edges. At sides 
on lower edge of calot divide distance 
of uncovered section in half. Mark. 

Fig. 15- — Cut a straight square of 
fabric 12" x 12". Divide in half on 
true bias line. Divide largest side of 
each triangle (bias edge) in half 
and mark. Match marking to mark- 
ing on uncovered side, right side out. 
Allow 1" of fabric to extend over 
lower edge. Pin all around. 







Fig. 16 — Trim sides of triangle on a 
line with center bias strip, allowing 
y%" seam allowance. Slip side piece 
under center bias piece. Pin. Repeat 
on other side. Remove from shape. 
Baste. Top stitch (see p. 48) center 
piece to two sides. Fit covering on 
frame. Pin all around bottom edge 
as in Fig. 5. Trim excess to y 2 " . 
Turn to wrong side. Baste. Apply 
sweatband as in Fig. 6. 

Fig. 1 7 — For trimming cut two strips 
of fabric and one of crinoline each 
39" long x 4" wide. Place two fabric 
strips right sides together. Place crin- 
oline strip on top. Stitch (%" seam) 
all three together, leaving a 4" open- 
ing along one side to turn, shaping 
ends as shown. Turn. On opening 





© 



2 



turn under %," and slip stitch (see 
p. 49). Press. Edge stitch. 
Fig. 18 — Mark center and measure 
5" to each side. Mark. Bring 5" 
markings together and gather tightly 
through both thicknesses. Make a 10" 
loop on each side in same manner. 
Sew trimming in desired position. 

13 A— Similar Calot Made 
from Pattern 

(i/2 yd. fabric, y 2 yd. crinoline, % 

yd. y 2 " belting ribbon.) 
Cut 1 piece from Pattern No. 13 A 
on p. 23. 

Cut two pieces from Pattern No. 13B 
on p. 23. Cut same from crinoline. 
Cut A on bias, B on straight. 

Fig. 19 — With right sides together, 
place side piece to center piece with 
curved edge of side fitted to center 
piece. Stitch (%," seam). Press open. 
Turn under y^" hem. Apply sweat- 
band as in Fig. 7. 




14 — Bow Calot with Back 
Ruffle and Matching Bag 

(1 yd. fabric, 3 skeins J. & P. Coats 
or Clark's O.N.T. Six Strand Em- 
broidery Floss, % yd. y 2 " ribbon 
belting, y 2 yd. heavy muslin, 3 
bone hooks and eyes.) 

Calot 

1. Cut 10 pieces from Pattern No. 14 
on p. 23. Cut a rectangle 12" x 22" 
for Ruffle, one 4" x Sy 2 " for Band, 
and one 9" x 24" for Bow. 

2. Make 2 calots of 5 sections each. 
Start at tip and stitch down each 
section. Press seams open. Place one 
calot insicle the other, right sides to- 
gether. Stitch around lower edge 
leaving ?y 2 " open at center back to 
insert Ruffle. Turn through opening. 
Baste around turned edge. Press. 

3. Fold Ruffle (12" x 22") piece in 
half to measure 6" x 22". Stitch 6" 
ends. Turn. Press. Gather (see p. 48) 
raw edges to 7y 2 " . Baste and press. 

4. Fold under y 2 " all around Band 
(4" x Sy 2 ff ) piece. Top stitch one 
edge of Band to Ruffle. Press seam 
up. Slip stitch (see p. 49) other edge 
to seam line on wrong side. Slip 
stitch ends together. 

5. Insert Band y 2 " in 7y 2 " opening 
of Calot. Slip stitch Calot to Band. 

6. Fold Bow (9" x 24") piece to 
measure M/ 2 " x 24". Stitch one end 
and side. Turn, baste around turned 
edges. Turn in y 2 " at open end. Slip 
stitch together. Press. 



7. Saddle stitch around edge of Bow 
(2 rows). Also saddle stitch 4 rows 
on Band, 2 rows around Ruffle, and 
along each side of each seam of 
Calot (see photo on p. 18). 

8. Tack Bow piece together making 
2 loops and 2 ends. Tack to center 
front of Calot. 

Bag 

1. Cutting edges on straight of goods, 
cut from heavy muslin: 2 rectangles 
7y 2 " x 14" for Bag; one rectangle 
3" x 10" for Band; one rectangle 
Sy 2 " x 10" for Flap. Using these as 
patterns cut two pieces of fabric from 
each piece of muslin. 

2. Stitch 2 fabric pieces for Bag 
(jy 2 " x 14") together along ends and 
one side. Turn. Do same with other 
two fabric pieces for Bag, and with 
muslin pieces for Bag. Place muslin 
Bag between two fabric Bags and 
baste all three together around open 
edge. Gather each side of top to 9". 

3. Place 2 fabric Band pieces (3" x 
10") right sides together. Place mus- 
lin Band piece on top. Stitch all three 
together along ends and one long 
side. Trim seam to ^4". Turn to right 
side. Baste around turned edges. 
Turn under y 2 " along both open 
edges of Band. Baste. Press. 

4. Repeat step 3 above with Flap 
pieces (Sy 2 " x 10"). 

5. Insert one side of Bag between 
Band pieces. Slip stitch (see p. 49) 
edges to y 2 " gathering line on Bag. 

6. Insert other side of Bag between 
Flap pieces in same manner. 

7. Saddle stitch around Flap and 
Band (2 rows). (See photo on p. 18). 

8. Whip (see p. 49) ends of Band to 
lower part of Flap where side edges 
meet. 

9. Sew on fastenings. 

15 — Knotted Cap and 
Brawstring Bag 

(1% yds. fabric. y 2 yd. heavy mus- 
lin, % yd. y 2 " ribbon belting.) 

Cap 

1. Cut 2 pieces from Pattern No. 15 
on p. 23, and two 5" circles. 

2. Stitch two pieces together around 
edge, leaving l\y 2 " side open. Turn. 

3. Turn up a 4" hem around lower 
edge. Stitch by machine. 

4. Turn lower edge up (on outside) 
to meet stitching line of hem. Tack 
in place. Turn up again (to outside) 
on this line. Tack. 

5. Apply sweatband as in Fig. 6. 

6. Gather tightly at bases of triangles. 

(cont'd on page 22) 

■21- 



— 



White Collar Class 

(cont'd from page 17) 

102 — Collar Medallion 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. & P. Coats Mer- 
cerized Crochet, size 30, 1 ball. 
Steel crochet hook No. 10 or 11. 

MOTIF . . . Ch 6. Join with si st to 
form ring. 1st rnd: Ch 7 (to count as 
d c and ch 4) * d c in ring, ch 4. Re- 
peat from * 4 more times. Join last 
ch-4 to 3rd st of 1st ch made. 2nd 
rnd: In each ch-4 sp make s c, h d c, 
d c, ch 1, d c, h d c and s c. 3rd rnd: 
SI st across to next ch-1 sp, ch 1, s c 
in same sp, * ch 10, s c in next ch-1 
sp. Repeat from * around joining last 
ch-10 with si st to 1st s c. 4th rnd: In 
each ch-10 sp make s c, 2 h d c, 3 d c, 
ch 1, 3 d c, 2 h d c and s c. Si st in 
1st s c. Turn. Hereafter work is done 
in rows. 5th row: With wrong side 
facing si st to next ch-1 sp, ch 1, s c 
in same sp. * ch 17, d c in 7th ch 
from hook, ch 3, skip 3 ch, d c in next 
ch, ch 6, s c in next ch-1 sp. Repeat 
from * 2 more times. Ch 1, turn. 6th 
row: S c in 1st s c, * ch 5, d c in next 
d c. 3 d c in next sp, d c in next d c, 
11 d c in next sp, d c in next d c, 3 
d c in next sp, d c in next d c, ch 5, 
s c in next s c. Repeat from * 2 more 
times. Ch 1. turn. 7th row: S c in 1st 
s c, * ch 3, d c in next d c, (ch 6, skip 
3 d c, d c in next d c) 5 times, ch 3, 
s c in next s c. Repeat from * 2 more 
times. Ch 1, turn. 8th row: S c in 1st 
s c, * ch 2, s c in next d c (in next sp 
make s c, h d c, 4 d c, h d c, s c, s c 
in next d c) 5 times; ch 2, s c in next 
s c. Repeat from * 2 more times. 
Fasten off. Make 5 more motifs same 
as this. 

Blind stitch three medallions on 
each side of collar as shown in photo- 
graph 7B, p. 15. 

103— Collar Medallion 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T or J. & P. Coats Mer- 
cerized Crochet, size 30, 1 ball. 
Steel crochet hook No. 11. 

1st CENTER . . . Ch 6. Join with 
si st to form ring. 1st rnd: Ch 3, s c 
in ring, * ch 2, s c in ring. Repeat 
from * 5 more times. Join with si st 
to 1st st of ch-3 first made. 2nd rnd: 
SI st in next ch-2 sp, ch 4, holding 
back last loop of each tr on hook 
make 2 tr in same sp, thread over 
and draw through all loops on hook 
(2 tr cluster), * ch 7, holding back 
last loop of each tr on hook make 3 
tr in next sp, thread over and draw 
through all loops on hook (3 tr clus- 
ter). Repeat from * around ending 
with ch 7. si st in top of 1st cluster. 
3rd rnd: * In next loop make 3 s e, 



ch 2 and 3 s c. Repeat from * around. 
Fasten off. 

2nd CENTER . , . Same as 1st 
Center. 

3rd CENTER , . . Work as for 1st 
Center until 2nd rnd is complete. 3rd 
rnd: In next loop make 3 s c, ch 2 and 
3 s c. 3 s c in next loop, ch 1, si st in 
any ch-2 loop of 1st Center, ch 1, 3 
s c in same loop on 3rd Center. In 
each of next 5 loops make 3 s c, ch 2 
and 3 s c, in next loop make 3 s c, ch 
1, si st in any ch-2 loop of 2nd Cen- 
ter, ch 1, 3 s c in same loop on 3rd 
Center. SI st in 1st s c made. Next 
rnd: SI st to next ch-2 loop, ch 4, in 
same loop make a 2 tr cluster, (ch 3, 
3 tr cluster) twice. SI st in next free 
ch-2 loop on 1st Center, (ch 7. in 
next ch-2 loop make tr, ch 4 and tr) 
6 times, tr in next free ch-2 loop on 
middle Center, (ch 7, in next ch-2 
loop make tr, ch 4 and tr) 3 times, 
ch 7, tr in next loop, in next free loop 
on 2nd Center make tr, ch 4 and tr, 
(ch 7. in next loop make tr. ch 4 and 
tr) 6 times, ch 7, si st in top of join- 
ing 2 tr cluster. Following rnd: 4 sc 
in next loop, ch 5, s c in 5th ch from 
hook, 4 sc in next loop, * 8 sc in next 
ch-7 loop, 4 sc in next ch-4 loop. Re- 
peat from * around. Join and fasten 
off. 

Blind stitch three medallions on 
each side of collar. 
IO i — Edging and Insertion 
MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. & P. Coats Mer- 
cerized Crochet, size 50, 1 ball. 
Steel crochet hook No. 12. 
EDGING . . . Make a chain the 
length desired. 1st row: S c in 5th ch 
from hook, (ch 3, skip 1 ch- s c in 
next ch) 3 times; (4 loops made), 

* ch 6, skip 4 ch, s c in next ch. (ch 
3, skip 1 ch, s c in next ch) 4 times. 
Repeat from * across, ending with 4 
ch-3 loops. Ch 4, turn. 2nd row: S c 
in next loop * (ch 3, s c in next loop) 
3 times; ch 4, skip 2 ch of ch-6 loop, 
d c in next ch, ch 2, d c in next ch, 
ch 4, s c in ch-3 loop. Repeat from * 
across. Ch 4, turn. 3rd row: S c in 
next loop. * ch 3 (s c in next loop) 
twice; ch 5, in next ch-2 sp make d c, 
ch 3 and d c; ch 5, s c in next ch-3 
loop. Repeat from * across. Ch 4, 
turn. 4th row: S c in next loop, 

* ch 2, s c in next loop, ch 6, d c in 
next d c, ch 2, in ch-3 sp make d c, ch 
2 and d c; ch 2. d c in next d c, ch 6, 
s c in next ch-3 loop. Repeat from * 
across. Fasten off. 

INSERTION . . . Starting at short 
end. ch 10. 1st row: S c in 5th ch from 
hook, (ch 3, skip 1 ch, s c in next ch) 
twice. Ch 4, turn. 2nd row: * S c in 
next loop, ch 3. Repeat from * across. 
Ch 4, turn. 

Repeat the last row for length 
desired. 



.Smart II on d work 

(cont'd from page 21) 

7. To make pompons, roll hem (see 
p. 49) around 5" circles. Make a 
running stitch close to edge, stuff 
with scraps, pull thread tight,, fasten. 
Attach to ends of tails. 

8. Tie tails in knot. Tack to shirring. 
Hag 

1. Cut a 7" circle of cardboard. Cut 
8" circles of fabric and of lining. 
Turn under y% " around edges of both 
circles, place cardboard between, 
overhand (see p. 49) edges together. 

2. Cut rectangle 16" x 26" from both 
fabric and muslin. Place both to- 
gether and seam 16" ends (4 thick- 
nesses) together. Make 2" hems at 
both ends of piece. Machine stitch. 
Run a row of machine stitching 
through center of one hem to make 
a casing. Open side seam between 
stitchings to insert tie. 

3. To make tie, cut strip 32" x 2", 
fold in half, stitch 32" sides together. 
Turn. Insert in casing and trim ends 
with pompons made from 4" circles 
(see step 7 under Cap above). 

4. Insert circle in bottom of bag and 
overhand (see p. 49) to side along 
line of hem. Turn up hem for cuff. 

16 — Lacy Crochet Brimmed 
Sailor and Crochet 
Trimmed Collar 

MATERIALS FOR CROCHET: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. & P. Coats Mer- 
cerized Crochet, size 10, 8 balls of 
White. 
Steel crochet hook No, 8 or 9. 

HAT 
Starting at inner edge of Brim, make 
a chain 54 inch longer than the head- 
size of Crown. Join with si st to form 
a ring being careful not to twist 
chain. 1st rnd: Ch 3, 2 d c in si st 
holding back on hook the last loop 
of each d c, thread over and draw 
through all loops on hook, ch 1 to 
fasten (a cluster made). * Skip 3 ch, 
2 d c in next ch holding back the last 
loop of each d c on hook, thread over 
and draw through all loops on hook, 
ch 4, si st in same place as last d c 
was made. Ch 4, 2 d c in 4th ch from 
hook holding back the last loop of 
each d c on hook and finish as for 
a cluster. Repeat from * around. 
Join. 2nd rnd: SI st in each ch and 
between 1st 2 clusters, s c in same 
place as last si st, * ch 4 and make 
a cluster in 4th ch from hook, cluster 
between next 2 clusters- ch 4. s c 
between same 2 clusters. Repeat from 
* around. Join. 

Repeat the last round until brim 
measures 2y 2 inches wide. Next rnd: 
SI st in each st to within 1st 2 clus- 
ters, s c between 2 clusters, * (ch 4. 

(cont'd on page 24) 



•22« 



Crochet abbreviations, page 50 



PATTERNS for DICKEYS, COLLARS and HATS 

To make patterns actual size, transfer diagrams as shown to large 
paper marked with 1" squares. One small square = one 1" square. 



t^ 










1 


L 










Hi 




































13 


































u 












































































fjy. 












































y 


& 




> 


















3 


B 






















\/A 


s * 


< 






























































































3A 

























^N 


N 


-1 












| 


2 














1- 






9 






1 


O 




B 


AC 


;k 






4 














u 












/ 




-cut. IpE! rviEw re; ^ 















ST 


RA 


OH 


T 


FO 


LO 














V 




J 




SU 


i%¥ 








































V 


^J 






/ 






















































































3 


















/ 


\ 
\ 




















































ID 


\ 




















































; 3 


* 
\ 












• 






































i 

— t 






\ 












•23< 



Crocheted Brim & Collar 

(Cont'd from page 22) 

cluster in 4th ch from hook) twice; 
s c between next 2 clusters. Repeat 
from * around. Join and fasten off. 
Starch firmly, pull into shape and 
lay aside to dry thoroughly. For 
crown, buy crinoline sailor frame in 
desired shape, cut off brim, cover as 
on p. 20, No. 12. Turn inside edge of 
crocheted brim up y 2 " and blind hem 
% to inside of crown. Cover a piece of 
millinery wire with grosgrain ribbon 
and stitch to wrong side of brim y 2 
inch in from edge. 

COLLAR EDGING 

Make a chain slightly longer than 
the outer edge of collar, allowing for 
fullness at corner. 1st row: * Make 
a cluster in 4th ch from hook, skip 
3 ch, cluster in next ch, ch 4, s c in 
same place as last d c of cluster, ch 
4, Repeat from * across, (ch 4, cluster 
in 4th ch from hook) twice; turn. 
2nd row: S c between 1st 2 clusters, 

* ch 4, cluster in 4th ch from hook, 
cluster at tip of next 2 clusters, ch 
4, si st between same 2 clusters. Re- 
peat from * across, (ch 4, cluster in 
4th ch from hook) twice; turn. 

Repeat the last row until piece 
measures 2% inches. Turn as before. 
Next row: S c between 1st 2 clusters, 

* (Ch 4, cluster in 4th ch from hook) 
twice; s c between next 2 clusters. 
Repeat from * across. Join. 

Starch if desired. Sew foundation 
chain to edge of V-necked collar No. 
7 (directions on p. 16), placing full- 
ness at corner. 

17— Triple Thread Snood 

MATERIALS: 

J. & P. Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen, 3 

balls of any color. 
Casein crochet hook No. 6. 
11 inches of round elastic. 
Use 3 strands throughout. Ch 51 to 
measure 12 inches. 1st row: S c in 
5th ch from hook, * ch 3, skip 2 ch, 
s c in next ch. Repeat from * across 
(16 loops). Ch 3, turn. 2nd row: 

* S c in next loop, ch 3. Repeat from 

* across. Ch 4, turn. 3rd row: * S c in 
next loop, ch 4. Repeat from * across. 
Ch 5, turn. 

Continue in this manner, always 
making 1 ch more in each loop on 
each row until there are 9 ch in each 
loop. Work straight (ch-9 loops) for 
13 rows. Next row: Work as for last 
row to within last loop, ending with 
an s c, ch 5, d tr in last loop. (1 loop 
decreased). Ch 9, turn. Repeat the 
last row until 6 loops remain. Fasten 
off. 

Sew one end of elastic to each end 
of foundation chain securely. Attach 
a triple strand of thread and work 
a row of s c closely across foundation 



chain keeping work flat, then work- 
ing over elastic in order to conceal 
it make 2 s c in each loop around 
to where thread was attached. Join 
and fasten off, 

FRILL ... 1st row: Find center of 
foundation chain and mark with a 
pin. Measure off 3% inches on each 
side of pin and mark with pins. Re- 
move center pin. Attach thread (3 
strands) to loop at one pin mark and 
ch 5, * in first half of loop make tr, 
ch 1 and tr; ch 1, in second half of 
loop on other side of s c, make (tr, 
ch 1) twice and tr. Repeat from * 
across to pin mark at other side. Ch 
5, turn. 2nd row: * In next ch-1 sp 
make tr, ch 1 and tr; ch 1. Repeat 
from * across. Ch 1, turn. 3rd row: 
2 s c in each ch-1 sp across. Fasten 
off. 

Sew each end of Frill to snood 
directly behind beginning and end of 
Frill keeping short sides flat. 

18 — Popcorn Calot 

MATERIALS: 

J. & P. Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen, 2 

balls of any color. 
Steel Crochet Hook No. 2. 
Use double thread throughout. Start- 
ing at tip of Crown, ch 6. Join with 
si st to form a ring. 1st rnd: Ch 3, 
14 d c in ring. Join to 3rd ch of ch-3. 
2nd rnd: Ch 4, pc st in same place 
as si st (to make a pc st ch 1, make 
5 d c in same place as si st, remove 
hook, insert it in ch preceding 5 d c 
and draw dropped loop through), 

* ch 1, pc st in next d c. Repeat from * 
around (15 pc sts). Join. 3rd rnd: 
Ch 4, pc st in same place as si st, 

* ch 2, pc st in next st. Repeat from * 
around, joining last ch-2 to top of 
starting ch-4 (15 pc sts). 4th rnd: 
SI st in next ch-2 sp, ch 3 and make 
a pc st in same sp, ch 2, pc st in 
same sp, * ch 2 in next ch-2 sp make 
pc st, ch 2 and pc st (an inc). Re- 
peat from * around. Join. 5th rnd: 
SI st in ch-2 sp, ch 3, pc st in same 
ch-2 sp, * ch 2, pc st in next ch-2 sp. 
Repeat from * around. 

Repeat the last rnd, increasing 
wherever necessary to keep work flat 
until piece measures 6y 2 inches in 
diameter. Work without increasing 
until piece measures 6 inches from 
tip of Crown. Join and fasten off, 

19 — Frill Pompadour Hat 

MATERIALS: 

J. & P. Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen, 1 

ball of any color. 
Casein Crochet Hook No. 6. 
Divide the thread into 3 equal balls. 
Use a triple thread throughout. To 
begin ch 18 to measure 4 inches. 1st 
row: S c in 6th ch from hook, (ch 2, 
skip 2 ch, s c in next ch) 4 times. 



Ch 3, turn. 2nd to 11th rows inch 

* S c in next loop, ch 3. Repeat from * 
across. Ch 4, turn. 12th row: (S c 
in next loop, ch 4) 4 times, turn (a 
loop decreased at end of row). 13th 
row: (S c in next loop, ch 4) 3 times; 
turn (another loop decreased). 14th 
to 18th rows inch * S c in next loop, 
ch 4. Repeat from * across. Ch 4, 
turn. Do not turn at end of 18th row 
but work in rounds as follows. 
FRILL ... 1st rnd: (Ch 4, s c in 
same loop as last s c) twice; (ch 4, 
in next loop make s c, ch 4, s c, ch 4 
and s c) 9 times; (ch 4, in next loop 
make s c, ch 4, s c, ch 4, s c, ch 4 
and s c) 10 times; * ch 4, in next 
loop make s c, ch 4, s c, ch 4 and s c. 
Repeat from * to end of round, mak- 
ing 3 loops (instead of 2 loops) at 
lower corner. 2nd rnd: (Ch 4, z c in 
next loop) 11 times; ch 4, s c in same 
loop as last s c— 1 loop increased— 
(ch 4, s c in next loop, ch 4, in next 
loop make s c, ch 4, s c, ch 4 and s c) 
29 times; * ch 4, s c in next loop. Re- 
peat from * to end of rnd, ending 
with an s c. Fasten off. Work is now 
done in rows instead of rnds. 1st row: 
Attach thread (3 strands) to 8th loop 
at beginning of previous rnd * ch 4 7 
s c in next loop. Repeat from. * to 
corresponding position on opposite 
side of Frill. Fasten off. 2nd row: At- 
tach thread (3 strands) to 15th loop 
at beginning of previous row, * ch 4, 
s c in next loop. Repeat from * to 
corresponding position at opposite 
side of Frill. Fasten off. 3rd row: At- 
tach thread (3 strands) to 10th loop 
at beginning of previous row, * ch 4, 
s c in next loop. Repeat from * to cor- 
responding position at opposite side 
of Frill. Fasten off. 

Weave in all loose ends and fasten 
them securely. If desired starch 
lightly or stiffen with millinery 
sizing. 

2© — Open Crown Double 
Crochet Calot 

MATERIALS: 

J. & P. Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen, 1 

ball of any color. 
Steel crochet hook No. 7 . 
Starting at top make a chain 12^ 
inches long (8*4 ch sts to 1 inch). 
Join with si st to 1st ch made, being 
careful not to twist chain. 1st rnd: 
Ch 3, d c in next 7 ch, * 2 d c in next 
ch (1 d c increased), d c in next 8 ch. 
Repeat from * around. Join with si st 
to 3rd ch of ch-3 first made. 2nd rnd: 
Ch 3, d c in next 4 d c, * 2 d c in 
next d c, d c in next 8 d c. Repeat 
from * around. Join. 3rd rnd: Ch 3, 
d c in each d c around. Join. 

Repeat the last 2 rnds alternately, 
but do not have increases fall over 
those of previous increase round, un- 
til circumference of hat measures 20 



•24- 



Crochet abbreviations, page SO 



inches. (If larger headsize is desired 
xaake a few more increases.) Work 
without increasing until piece meas- 
ures 3% inches from starting chain. 
Join round and work a si st in each 
<d c around. Join and fasten off. 

Place flowers over joining of rounds 
-and sew securely in place. 

21 — Closed Crown Single 
Crochet Calot 

MATERIALS: 

J. & "IP. Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen, 2 

balls of any color. 
Steel Crochet Hook No. 7. 

Starting at tip of Crown, ch 2. 1st 
rnd: 8 s c in 2nd ch from hook. Do 
not join rnds. 2nd rnd: 2 s c in each 
s c around. 3rd rnd: * S c in next s c, 
2 s c in next s c. Repeat from * 
around. 4th rnd: S c in each s c 
around. Repeat the last rnd, increas- 
ing wherever necessary to keep work 
flat until piece measures 3^ inches, 
now work as follows: 1st rnd: S c in 
each s c around. 2nd rnd: * S c in 
next 8 s c, 2 s c in next s c. Repeat 
from * around. 3rd rnd: S c in each 
s c around. 4th rnd: S c in next 4sc, 

* 2 s c in next s c, s c in next 8sc, 
Repeat from * around. 5th rnd: S c 
in each s c around. 6th rnd: Repeat 
2nd round. Repeat the last 4 rounds 
until circumference measures 20 
inches. (If a larger headsize is de- 
sired make a few more increase 
rnds.) Work without increasing until 
piece measures 6y 2 inches from tip 
of Crown. Now si st in each s c 
around. Join and fasten off. 

FRILL . . . With single thread make 
a chain 13 inches long. 1st row: Tr 
in 6th ch from hook, * ch 1, skip 1 
ch, tr in next ch, ch 1, tr in same ch. 
Repeat from * across. Ch 5, turn. 2nd 
and 3rd rows: Tr in next ch-1 sp, 

* ch 1, tr in next sp, ch 1, tr in same 
sp. Repeat from * across. Ch 5, turn. 
4th and 5th rows: Tr in 1st sp, * ch 1, 
tr in next sp. Repeat from * across. 
Ch 4, turn. 6th row: * S c in next sp, 
ch 4. Repeat from * across. Fasten 
off. Starch Frill very stiff and press. 
Pleat Frill to measure 5 inches and 
sew to front of Calot, 1 inch up from 
edge. Extend ends of Frill as far as 
possible on either side and sew to 
Calot. 

22 — Crochet Trimmed Felt 
Hat 

MATERIALS: 

J. & P. Coats Knit-Cro-Sheen, 1 

ball of any color. 
A large brimmed felt hat, with very 

shallow crown. 
Steel crochet hook No. 1. 
Cut away crown of hat, leaving about 
Y 2 inch on which to sew crocheted 
crown. Be very careful not to enlarge 



head opening. Also, cut away any 
wire or other stiffening from outer 
edge of brim. Clean brim, if neces- 
sary, then lay flat on ironing board 
and press with hot iron through 
damp cloth. Allow to dry. 
Note: Crochet is worked with double 
strand of thread throughout. Divide 
ball of thread into 2 parts. 

CROCHETED CROWN . . . With 
double strand of thread, ch 5, join 
with si st to form a ring. 1st rnd: S c 
in ring, (ch 5, s c in loop) 5 times; 
ch 2, d c in 1st s c made (6 loops). 
2nd and 3rd rnds: S c in loop, (ch 5, 
s c in next loop) 5 times; ch 2, d c in 
1st s c made. 4th rnd: S c in loop, ch 

4, d c in same place as last d c, * ch 4, 
s c in loop, ch 4, d c in s c. Repeat 
from * around ending with d c in last 
s c of previous rnd, tr in 1st s c of 4th 
rnd. 5th rnd: Ch 3, work d c, ch 3 and 
d c in same place as joining tr, * ch 3, 
s c in d c, ch 3, in next s c work d c. 
ch 3 and d c. Repeat from * around 
ending with ch 1, d c in joining tr. 
6th rnd: SI st in sp, s c in same sp, 
* ch 5, s c in next sp. Repeat from * 
around ending with ch 2, d c in 1st s c 
(18 loops). 7th rnd: S c in loop, * ch 

5. s c in next loop. Repeat from * 
around ending with ch 2. d c in 1st 
s c. 8th rnd: S c in loop, ch 3, d c. in 
same place as last d c. * ch 3, s c in 
next loop, ch 3, d c in s c. Repeat 
from * around ending with d c in 1st 
s c. 9th rnd: SI st in sp, ch 3, d c in 
next sp, * ch 3, tr in d c, ch 3, d c in 
next 2 sps. Repeat from * around end- 
ing with ch 3, si st in top of starting 
ch-3. 10th rnd: SI st in d c. 3 ch and 
tr; ch 3, * tr in next 2 ch-3 sps. d c 
in next tr, ch 3, d c in next ch-3 sp, 
ch 1, d c in next ch-3 sp, ch 3, d c in 
next tr. Repeat from * around ending 
with ch 3, si st in top of starting ch-3. 
11th rnd: SI st in next st, s c between 
the 2 tr, * (ch 5. s c in next ch-3 sp) 
twice; ch 5. s c between next 2 tr. 
Repeat from * around ending with 
ch 2, d c in 1st s c. 12th rnd: S c in 
loop, * ch 5, s c in next loop. Repeat 
from * around, ending as before. 

Place felt brim on head, then try 
on crown and see if crown is deep 
enough to meet edge of felt. If not, 
repeat the 12th rnd to desired depth. 
Fasten off. 

EDGING . . . Edging is worked di- 
rectly around edge of felt brim. It is 
advisable to have a sharp sewing 
needle on hand to make holes in felt. 
Holes are made about every */2 inch 
apart and about y 2 mc h i n from edge. 
Number of holes must be a multiple 
of 6. 1st rnd: Attach double strand of 
thread to a hole at center back, work 
long s c in same place. * ch 3, long 
s c in next hole. Repeat from * around 
ending with ch 3, si st in 1st s c. 2nd 
rnd: S c in loop, * (d c, ch 2 and d c 



in next loop) twice; s c in next loop. 
Repeat from * around ending with 
si st in 1st s c. 3rd rnd: SI st in next 
d c, 2 ch, and next 2 d c; s c in same 
place as last si st, * d c in next d c, 
ch 2, tr in s c, ch 2, d c in next d c, 
s c in next 2 d c. Repeat from * 
around ending with s c in d c, si st in 
1st s c. 4th rnd: * Ch 2, in next sp 
work d c, ch 2 and d c; in next sp 
work d c, ch 2 and tr; in next sp 
work tr, ch 2 and d c ; in next sp work 
d c, ch 2 and d c. Ch 2, s c between 
next 2 s c. Repeat from * around. 
Join and fasten off. 

Block edging, pulling scallops into 
shape. Sew crocheted crown in place 
sewing crown over edge of felt brim. 

23 — Made-Over Visor Cap 

MATERIALS: 

Chadwick's Red Heart Knitting 

Worsted, 1 ball (1 oz. ball). 
One old "Pork Pie" hat. 
Steel crochet hook No. 1. 
Brush hat and steam thoroughly over 
a boiling tea kettle. Remove trim and 
headband. Measure 2% inches for 
depth of Crown at front and mark 
with a pin. Measure 4 inches for 
depth of Crown at back and mark. 
Place pins around hat starting from 
pin mark at front and graduating 
pins to 4 inch depth at back. Cut 
along pin markings being careful not 
to cut into brim. Place a pin at cen- 
ter front of inner edge of brim just 
cut off. Measure off 5 inches on each 
side of center pin and mark. Place 
pins on a straight line from the 
marked points to outer edge of brim. 
Cut remainder of brim away leaving 
the 10 inches for peak at front. Curve 
the corners. Remove pins on Crown, 
excepting the center front pin. Place 
inner edge of peak inside Crown 
matching center front pins. Sew peak 
in place. With an embroidery stiletto 
or sharp pointed scissors pierce holes 
*4 inch apart and *4 inch in from 
edge, all along edge of peak and 
around edge of back of Crown being 
careful not to tear cap. With right 
side of cap facing attach yarn in any 
hole at back of cap. Work s c in each 
hole all around back of cap and peak. 
Join with si st. Ch 1, turn. Next rnd: 
With wrong side facing work s c in 
same holes as last rnd. Join. Ch 1, 
turn. Following rnd: Work si st in 
each s c of last rnd. Fasten off. 

TIES (Make 2) . . . Ch 73. D c in 4th 

ch from hook and in each ch across. 
Fasten off. Fasten end of Ties where 
ends of peak join Crown. Tie in a 
bow at center front. 



Crochet abbreviations, page 5© 



•25- 





IT'S THE LITTLE THINGS 
IN LIFE THAT COUNT 

24. Pompon Trimmed Felt Pillbox. 25A to K. 

Crocheted Button Trimmings. 2G. Bandanna 
Skirt and Two Piece Halter. 27. Patchwork 
Skirt. 28. Crocheted Belt and Frogs. 20. Cro- 
cheted Frogs and Braid Trim. 30. Crocheted 
Twisted Necklace and Earrings. 31. Crocheted 
Star Necklace and Earring Set. 32. Crocheted 
Wool Pocket. 33A and B. Crocheted Wool 
Edgings. 



Direction s For Making all 

Articles Mentioned Begin 

On Next Page 




Learn how to crochet. 



33 4 







33ft >X 




Crocheted Trimmings — frogs, 
bands, edgings, pockets — in wool or 
cotton — inexpensive ways to dress 
up old clothes and enliven new ones. 



3a 







31 





" i" ■ 

IB ■ 

fl 



look 170, "Learn How" 



SO 



29 



Necklaces and matching earrings of 
cotton crochet — non-priority jewelry that 
has plenty of priority on style. 



•27- 




Illustrations on pages 26 and 



24 — Pompon Trimmed 
Felt Pillbox 

MATERIALS: 

Chadwick's Red Heart Sweater 

Wool, 1 oz. ball. 
One old felt pillbox hat. 
Steel crochet hook No. 1. 
Take all trimming off hat. Brush and 
steam hat thoroughly over a boiling 
kettle. 

POMPON FLOWERS . . . Ch 2. 

1st rnd: 9 s c in 2nd ch from hook. 
2nd rnd: * Ch 10, s c in front loop 
of next s c. Repeat from * around. 
3rd rnd: * Ch 10, s c in remaining 
hack loop of next s c. Repeat from * 
around. Fasten off. 
Cut a cardboard 1 y% inches wide and 
3 inches long. Wind yarn 40 times 
around width of cardboard. Break 
yarn. Slip off cardboard. Wind yarn 
tightly around center of this bundle 
and tie. Cut loops of bundle and trim 
evenly. Pull tying strands through 
center of chain petals. Make 7 more 
Pompon Flowers same as this. Group 
5 flowers on left side of hat and 3 
flowers on right side of hat. 

25 — Crocheted Button 
Trimmings 

A — Basic Crochet Button in Any 
Size ... A variety of textures may be 
obtained by making the same button 
out of different materials: Knit-Cro- 
Sheen, Pearl Cotton or Shetland Floss. 
Buttons are worked over buttonmolds 
or old buttons as follows: 1st rnd: 
Ch 2, 6 s c in 2 nd ch from hook. Do 
not join rnds. 2nd rnd: 2 s c in each 
st around. 3rd rnd: * 2 s c in next st, 
s c in next st. Repeat from * around 
(6 increases). 4th rnd: S c in each 
s c around increasing as necessary to 
keep work flat (about 6 increases on 
each rnd). Continue in this manner 
until piece is size of buttonmold or 
button which is to be covered. Work 
2 rnds straight (no increases). Now 
decrease by working in every other 
st around (inserting button or button- 
mold before opening gets too small) 
until all sts have been worked off. . 
Fasten off. 

B — 2-Color Crochet Button in Any 
Size . . . Use Pearl Cotton. Work over 
buttonmolds or old buttons as fol- 
lows: 1st rnd: With 1st color, ch 4, 
11 d c in 4th ch from hook. Join with 
si st to top of starting ch-4. Fasten 
off. 2nd rnd: Attach 2nd color in 
same place as si st, ch 1. 2 s c in same 



place, then work 2 s c in each d c 
around (24 s c). Do not join. Now 
follow directions for Basic Crochet 
Button — starting with 4th rnd. 

C — Crocheted Barrel Button . . . Use 
Pearl Cotton or Mercerized Crochet 
Cotton. 1st and 2nd rnds: Same 
as 1st and 2nd rnds of Basic 
Crochet Button, This gives size of 1 
end of button, if wider barrel is de- 
sired work 3rd rnd of Basic Button. 
Next rnd: Work s c in each s c around 
(no increases). Repeat the last rnd 
until button is length desired. Stuff 
firmly with absorbent cotton, or extra 
strands of thread, then decrease by 
working off 2 sts as 1 until no sts 
remain. Fasten off. 

D — Crocheted Ball Buttons in Any 
Size . . . Use Pearl Cotton or Mer- 
cerized Crochet Cotton. 1st to 4th 
rnds inch Same as 1st to 4th rnds 
incl of Basic Crochet Button. 
Repeat the 4th rnd until piece 
is size of button desired. Work 2 rnds 
straight (no increases) then decrease 
by working in every other st around 
until only very small opening re- 
mains. Stuff very firmly with ab- 
sorbent cotton, or extra strands of 
thread, then continue decreasing un- 
til no sts remain. Fasten off. 

E — Rainbow Button . . . Made with 
Mexicana yarn over a 1 y 2 inch but- 
tonmold as follows: Cut a complete 
color sequence of yarn, starting with 
Purple and ending with Blue. Thread 
into a sewing needle and make a 
knot at the Purple end. Work through 
hole in center of buttonmold and 
around outer edges, make 9 stitches 
(or spokes) evenly spaced around. 
Fasten on wrong side and bring yarn 
through to top. Now weave over and 
under the spokes from center out un- 
til yarn is all used up. Fasten off. 

F and G. Any plain 2-hole button 
can be made very decorative by sew- 
ing on with odd scraps of yarn. F is 
sewed on with a strand of Knitting 
Worsted, which is made into a bow. 
G is sewed on with scraps of 3 differ- 
ent colors of Shetland . Floss which 
are knotted together at center and 
then cut, leaving 6 ends. 

H and I — Crocheted Flower Buttons 

. . . Use Knit- Cro- Sheen. Work over 
flat pearl button for base as follows: 
H — Single Flower Button: 1st and 
2nd rnds: Same as 1st and 2nd rnds 
of Basic Crochet Button. 3rd rnd: 



Work in front loop only of eac. 
around as follows: * In next st v 
half d c, d c, 3 tr, d c and half ( 
s c in next st. Repeat from * aro 
(6 petals) . 4th rnd: Working in t 
of petals, work 2 s c in back loop o 
of each st of 2nd rnd. 5th rnd: S ( 
each s c around. Now decrease 
working in every other st aroi 
(inserting flat pearl button bef 
opening gets too small) until all 
are worked off. Fasten off. 

I — Double Flower Button: 1st to - 
rnds incl: Same as 1st to 4th rnds i 
of Single Flower Button. 5th n 
Work in front loop only of each 
around as follows: S c in next 2 I 
* in next st work half d c, d c. 3 
d c and half d c as before; s c in n« 
3 sts. Repeat from * around. 6th rr 
Working in back of petals, work 
in back loop only of each st of - : 
rnd. Now decrease by working 
every other st around (inserting f 
pearl button before hole gets 1 
small) until all sts are worked i 
Fasten off. 

Jf and K — Bone Ring Buttons . 

Use Shetland Floss. Work over bo 
rings in size desired as follows: W 
crochet hook work half d c clos< 
all around ring. Break yarn, lea v. 
a 12 inch end. Thread this end ii 
a sewing needle and run throu 
outer edge of each st around. Dr. 
yarn tight thus turning sts in tow, 
center of ring. Fasten securely. 
ing hole entirely. This complete 
K is embroidered with a flower 
lazy daisy st in contrasting col 

26 — Bandanna Skirt and 
Two-Piece Halter 

SKIRT . . . Measure skirt leng 
waist to hem. Bandanna handk 
chiefs come in several sizes, 27" 
27", 24" x 24". and 24" (wide) x S 
(long). Buy the size according 
skirt length. 

Materials: 5 bandannas, snap fast' 
ers. 

Stitch selvage edges (length) oi 
bandannas together. Leave one s* 
open 7" for side opening. Press sea 
open. Turn under and hem down 
at front of opening. Run two ro^ < 
loose machine stitching aroun : 
edge, 1 /r>" and %" from edg 
other bandanna, cut 2 strips • 
wide for Skirt Belt. Join on- 
each piece to make long bell 
ure waistline and divide : 



.?«. 









ment into 4 equal parts. Measure 
these distances off on belt using seam 
as center and mark with bastings 
(Fig. 1). Fold belt in half length- 
wise, right side inside, and stitch up 
ends to first markings. These are for 
ties. Turn ends. Press. Pull up skirt 
gathers. Placing right side of skirt 
against right side of belt, match 
seams on skirt to markings on belt 
(ends of belt at opening). Adjust 
gathers to fit, distribute evenly, pin, 
baste. Stitch on y%" gathering line. 
Press band up. Turn under £&" on 
inner edge of belt and slip stitch to 
seam. Sew several snaps along 7" 
side opening. 



TWO-PIECE HALTER . . . Mate- 
rials: 1 square bandanna (27" size is 
preferable but 24" will do for size 
12), 2 buttons. (Straps are cut from 
extra bandanna from which skirt belt 
was cut.) 

Draw a line from corner to corner 
of bandanna and cut in half diagon- 
ally. Hem cut edge with narrow ma- 
chine hem of about \%J* Cut 2 strap 
pieces each 5" wide from bandanna 
used for skirt belt. Fold strap pieces 
right side inside and stitch length- 
wise edges together. Turn. Press. 
Make sure pattern on band is cen- 
tered as it is pressed. Seam will there- 
fore be at center of wrong side. Stitch 
corner of each triangle to strap (see 
illustration). Tie triangles around 
body (Fig. 2). Cross straps at back 
and pin in comfortable position. Sew 
buttons to halter on these points and 
make worked buttonholes (see p. 49) 
in corresponding position on straps. 
Cut off strap ends \y 2 " beyond but- 
tonhole, turn in ends y 2 ", and slip 
stitch edges together. Fit out excess 
fullness at side front over bust by 
taking small darts. 




-=2^" 



27— Patchwork Skirt 

(% yd. each of 5 different cotton 
prints or enough large pieces from 
the scrap bag.) 

The finished skirt is 25" in length 
from belt to hemline. There is a 3" 
allowance for seams and hem. Alter 
length at hemline. Take a piece of 
paper you can use as a pattern. Cut 



it to measure 28" x 30". On sides of 
paper measure off various distances 
as shown in (Fig. 3). Join points and 
mark numbers as illustrated, Cut pa- 
per along dotted line. Save one half 
for a guide. Cut out each shape of 
other half carefully following ruled 
lines. Cut six pieces of material from 
each shape, marking number of piece 
on back. Join one piece of each num- 
ber, following half diagram which 
was not cut apart. Join pieces to- 
gether along correct sides. Join shapes 
to make 5 more sections like this. 
Match 2 sections together joining on 
dotted line (Fig. 3), making a large 
piece about 28" x 30". Make 2 more 
pieces the same. Stitch the 3 together 
on their length. Leave one seam open 
7" from top for side opening. Back 
stitch y z " at bottom edge of skirt. 
Turn up a 2" hem and finish by hand. 
For belt, cut 2 strips of any color 
used, 4" wide and 27" long. Finish 
side opening and belt as described in 
Bandanna Skirt No, 26 above. 




28 — Belt and Frogs 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. & P. Coats 
Pearl Cotton, size 5, 9 balls of 
any color. 

Steel crochet hook No. 2/0 (double 
zero) . 

5 buttons, 5 / 8 inch in diameter. 
This material is sufficient for a belt 
and 3 complete frogs. 

BELT . . . With triple thread, ch 14. 
Join with si st to form ring. Make 
20 s c in ring. * Ch 20, turn. SI st 
in 14th ch from hook. Turn. Make 

6 s c in ring, drop loop from hook, 
insert hook in 6th s c on last ring 
and pull loop through thus joining 
rings, 14 s c in chain- ring. Repeat 
from * until piece measures desired 
waist measurement. Ch 14, turn, si 
st in 14th ch from hook, turn. Make 
20 s c in chain-ring (this is button 
loop). Ch 14, turn, si st in 14th ch 
from hook. Make 20 s c in chain- 
ring. SI st in base of 3 rings. * Make 
5 s c in the chain joining rings, si 
st in base of next ring, ch 14, turn. 
SI st in 14th ch from hook. Make 
20 s c in chain-ring. Repeat from * 
across. Fasten off. 

If desired, belt can be faced with 
grosgrain ribbon or dress material. 



FROGS . . . With triple thread ch 
14. Join with si st to form ring. Make 
20 s c in ring. * Ch 14, turn, si st in 
14th ch from hook, turn. Make 20 
s c in ring, si st in base of ring. Re- 
peat from * once more. Fasten off. 
Make another piece same as this but 
do not fasten off. Ch 20, turn. SI st in 
20th ch from hook, turn. Make 30 
s c in ring, sl st in base of rings. 
Fasten off. 

BUTTON: With triple thread ch 2. 
1st rnd: 6 s c in 2nd ch from hook. 
Do not join rnds. 2nd rnd: 2 s c in 
each st around (12 sts). 3rd rnd: S c 
in each st around. Place button in- 
side this piece. * Work off 2 sts as 
1 st, s c in next st. Repeat from * 
until opening is entirely closed. Fas- 
ten off. Make another button same as 
this. Sew a button at base of rings 
on each piece. 

29 — Crocheted Frogs and 
Braid Trim 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. & P. Coats 
Pearl Cotton, size 5, 4 balls of 
any color. 

Steel Crochet Hook No. 1. 

14 bone rings 5 / s inch in diameter, 

BRAID: With double thread ch 6, 
s c in 3rd ch from hook (p made), 
ch 3, d c in 1st chain made (start- 
ing ch). Ch 3, turn. 2nd row: S c 
in top of d c (p), ch 3, d c in s c 
of p of row below. Ch 3, turn. Repeat 
2nd row for length desired. Fasten off. 

BACK BELT: With double thread, 
ch 6, s c in 3rd ch from hook (p 
made), ch 3, d c in 1st chain made. 
Ch 6, turn. 2nd row: S c in 3rd ch 
from hook (p), ch 3, d c in d c, ch 
v 3, d c in s c of p of row below. Ch 3, 
turn. 3rd row: S c in d c (p), ch 3, 
d c in d c, ch 3, d c in s c of p of 
row below. Ch 3, turn. Repeat 3rd 
row until piece is 5y 2 inches. Fasten 
off. 

RING MEDALLIONS: With double 
thread work 32 s c over a bone ring. 
Join with sl st to 1st s c made. 1st 
rnd: Ch 7, s c in 3rd ch from hook, 
ch 1, d c in same place as sl st, 

* eh 1, skip 3 s c, d c in next s c, ch 4, 
s c in 3rd ch from hook, ch 1, d c in 
same place as last d c. Repeat from 

* ending with ch 1, sl st in 3rd st of 
1st ch made. Fasten off. Fasten a 
Ring Medallion to each end of Back 
Belt, 

FROGS: With double thread ch 13. 
1st row: D c in 4th ch from hook, 

* ch 1, skip 1 ch, holding back last 2 

(cont'd on page 30) 



Crocfaet abbreviations, page 50 



•29- 



TELLING TRIFLES 



(continued) 



Crocheted Frogs and 

Itraid Trim (cont'd from page 29) 

loops of each d c on hook make 2 d c 
in next ch, thread over and draw 
through all loops on hook (cluster). 
Ch 7, turn. 2nd row: S c in 3rd ch 
from hook, ch 1, d c in base of turn- 
ing ch, * d c in top of next cluster, 
ch 4. s c in 3rd ch from hook, ch 1, 
d c in same cluster. Repeat from * 
to end of piece; then work along op- 
posite side of clusters in same way. 
Join to 3rd st of turning ch. 3rd row: 
Ch 7, s c in 3rd ch from hook, * d c 
between 2 d c, ch 4, s c in 3rd ch 
from hook. Repeat from * around. 
Join. Fasten off. 

RING TRIM: S c closely over ring. 
Join to 1st s c made, make a 2-inch 
chain; then cover another ring. Join 
and fasten off. Sew a set of rings on 
Frog, draping chain between rings. 

TIES: Ch 1, pull loop on hook out 1 
inch (thread over, insert hook in 
same ch-1 and pull loop out 1 inch) 
4 times; thread over and draw 
through all loops on hook, ch 1 to 
fasten. Continue making chain until 
Tie measures 7 inches. Fasten off. 
Attach Tie to end of Frog. Make 5 
more Frogs same as this. 

,JO— Twisted Necklace 
and Earrings 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. &■ P. Coats 
Pearl Cotton, size 5, one ball each 
of Blue and Yellow, or any other 
colors. 
Steel Crochet Hook No. 5. 

2 earring bases. 

NECKLACE . . . With Yellow make 
a chain 13 inches long (about 8 ch 
sts to 1 inch). 1st row: S c in 2nd ch 
from hook and in each ch across. Ch 
1, turn. 2nd row: Work in the back 
loop only of each st. * In next st 
make s c, h d c, d c and tr, in next 
st make tr, d c, h d c and s c. Repeat 
from * across. Fasten off. 3rd row: 
Attach Blue in front half of 1st st 
of last row and work same as 2nd 
row. Fasten off. Attach Yellow in 
end of foundation ch and work s c 
in opposite side of foundation chain. 
Ch 1. turn. Then work as for 2nd 
row. Fasten off. Attach Blue and 
work as for 3rd row. Fasten off. 

For Ties, attach Yellow at one end 
of foundation chain, make a chain 8 
inches long. Then work as for 1st 



row of necklace. Fasten off. Attach 
Blue at other end of foundation chain 
and work same as Yellow Tie. 

EARRINGS . . . With Yellow ch 5. 
Work exactly as for Necklace (4 rows 
of 2 petals each). Sew securely to 
earring base. 

31 — Star Necklace and 
Earring Set 

MATERIALS: 

Clark's O.N.T. or J. & P. Coats 
Pearl Cotton, size 5, 2 balls of 
Blue and 1 ball each of Red and 
White. 

Steel crochet hooks Nos. 2 and 7 . 

2 earring bases. 

NECKLACE — NECKBAND . . . 

With double strand of Blue and No. 
2 hook ch 115 to measure 17 inches. 
1st row: D c in 4th ch from hook, 
d c in 3 ch, * 2 d c in next ch. d c 
in 5 ch. Repeat from * 1 7 more times. 
Ch 1, turn. 2nd row: * S c in 9 sts, 

2 s c in next st. Repeat from * across. 
Ch 1, turn. 3rd row: S c in each st 
across. Fasten off. 

STARS . . . With single strand of 
Red. and No. 7 hook, ch 2. 1st rnd: 
10 s c in 2nd ch from hook. Join with 
si st to 1st s c made. 2nd rnd: * Ch 
4, s c in 2nd ch from hook, h d c in 
next ch, d c in next ch, skip 1 s c, si 
st in next s c (a point made). Repeat 
from * around (5 points). Join and 
fasten off. Make another piece same 
as this but do not fasten off. Place 
both pieces together and work s c 
through both thicknesses around all 
5 points. Fasten off. Make 4 more 
same as this. Then make 4 White and 

3 Blue. Sew 2 points of a Red star to 
center front of Neckband. Sew 2 Red 
stars on both sides of center star hav- 
ing 1 inch between. Sew 2 points of 
each White star between lower 
points of Red stars. Sew 1 point of 
each Blue star to bottom free point of 
3 center Red stars. Sew on snap fas- 
tener to fasten. 

EARRINGS . . . Make 2 Blue Stars 
as on Necklace and sew to earring 
bases. 

32_WooI Pocket 

MATERIALS: 

Chadwick's Red Heart Shetland 

Floss. app?~oximately 8 yards. 
A steel crochet hook No. 3. 
Ch 23. 1st row: D c in 8th ch from 



hook, * ch 2, skip 2 ch, d c in next 
ch. Repeat from * across (6 sps). Ch 
3, turn. 2nd row: (2 d c in next sp, 
d c in next d c) 5 times, 20 d c in 
next sp, (d c in base of next d c, 2 
d c in next sp) 5 times, 4 c in base 
of last d c, ch 5, turn. 3rd row: (Skip 
2 d c, d c in next d c) 7 times, ch 5, 
d c in same place as last d c, (ch 2, 
skip 2 d c, d c in next d c) 3 times, 
ch 5, d c in same place as last d c, 
(ch 2. skip 2 d c, d c in next d c) 
7 times. Ch 3, turn. 4th row: (2 d c 
in next sp, d c in next d c) 7 times, 
11 d c in next sp, (d c in next d c, 
2 d c in next sp) 3 times, d c in next 
d c. 1 1 d c in next sp. d c in next d c„ 
(2 d c in next sp, d c in next d c) 
7 times. Ch 3, turn. 5th row: (Skip 
2 d c, d c in next d c ) 9 times, ch 5, 
d c in same place as last d c, (ch 2, 
skip 2 d c, d c in next d c) 7 times, 
ch 5. d c in same place as last d c, 
(ch 2, skip 2 dc, d c in next d c) 
9 times. Ch 3, turn. 6th row: D c in 
each d c, 2 d c in each sp, 11 d c in 
each corner sp. Ch 6, turn. 7th row: 
* Skip 2 d c, s c in next d c, ch 5. 
Repeat from * around. Ch 1, turn. 
8th row: In each loop make 3 s c, 
ch 3 and 3 s c; then work s c across 
top of pocket. Fasten off. 

33A & B— Wool Edgings 

MATERIALS: 

Chadwick's Red Heart Shetland 

Floss, odd pieces. 
Steel crochet hook No. 3. 

33 A . . . Ch 4. 1st row: In 4th ch 
from hook make 3 d c, ch 3, s c in 
3rd ch from hook (p), and 4 d c (a 
shell), ch 9, turn. 2nd row: S c in 
9 th ch from hook, ch 3, si st in p. 
Ch 3, turn. 3rd row: Shell in same 
p, s c in next loop, ch 3, s c in next 
loop. Ch 5, turn. 4th row: S c in next 
loop, ch 3, si st in p, ch 3, turn. 
Repeat 3rd and 4th rows for pattern. 

33 B . . . ** Ch 3, * insert hook in 
3rd ch from hook and pull loop 
through; yarn over. Repeat from * 3 
more times, and draw through all 
loops on hook — an s c-cluster made. 
Repeat from ** for length desired. 
Ch 5, turn. Now work along one 
long edge (where single loops be- 
tween clusters appear J as follows: 
1st row: In each single loop between 
clusters make d c, ch 2 and d c. Ch 1 . 
turn. 2nd row: * 3 s c in next sp. 
skip 2 d c. s c in next sp, in same 
sp make (ch 5, s c) 3 times; skip 
next 2 d c. Repeat from * across. 
Fasten off. 



'30' 



Crochet abbreviations, page 50 




IG WAY 




C0W £* B 



Chances are your closets have their quota of old coats and suits, too 
good to give away but too antiquated in cut to come out in the open. 
Every home has its collection of tired dresses, shirts weak in the 
collar. And nowadays many have a number of suits — made of 
precious priority wools - — ■ drooping forlorn and unworn on their 
hangers while their owners are away wearing Uncle Sam's latest 
models. 

If you only knew it, there's probably a whole winter's ward- 
robe for you and your family waiting to be rescued from the moths. 
Frocks, rompers and sunsuits for your small fry, blouses and under- 
wear for you out of old shirts; a snug reefer for Junior out of an 
old suit coat or a pair of flannel trousers. Pinafores and bathing suits 
emerge like painted butterflies from the chrysalis of old dresses 
and the tailored suit you've always had your heart set on is yours 
for the making out of a man's suit. 

There's probably no satisfaction to equal the thrill of making 
something out of nothing. It takes only a little wit, time and 
patience to turn total losses into handsome profits! 



GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS 




I. Is It Worth While To Make Over 

When making over clothing, the first considera- 
tion is whether the material is in sufficiently good 
condition to warrant the time spent on it. 

Woolen material may often be turned to the 
wrong side if the outer part is worn and^ thread- 
bare. Even when a material has a pronounced right 
and wrong side, it may often be reversed with good 
results. Small holes and tears may be darned or 
covered with a decorative detail. 

Cottons, silks and rayons should be held up to 
the light to see weak spots around the places where 
tears or breaks have already occurred. It may still 
be possible to use other parts. 

II. Selection of Suitable Pattern 

When you have determined the desirability of 
making over, the next step is to choose a pattern 
suitable to the style and the material. On the fol- 
lowing pages suggestions are made which may 
offer some inspiration and guidance in making the 
most of what you have on hand. 

III. Cleaning 

It is preferable to have garments washed or 
dry cleaned before starting to rip as it is more 
pleasant to work with a clean fabric. 



IV. To Rip or Not To Rip 

Whenever the size of a garment permits, it is 
advisable to cut it apart at the seams. When the 
garment is to be ripped there are two methods 
that are acceptable. 

Method No. I . . . Clip a thread and rip out a 
few stitches with the head of a needle until there is 
enough to grasp. Pull the thread until it breaks. 
Turn garment to the other side and pull the thread 
until it breaks. Continue this method of working 
from one side to another until the seam is ripped. 
This method has the advantage of not leaving any 
threads in the seams. 

Method No. II . . . Rip seams with a stiff one- 
edged razor blade or better still, buy a gadget in 
which a two-edged razor blade may be screwed. 

V. Preparation of Material 

After material has been ripped it should be 
pressed carefully (see p. 49). It may be desirable 
to mark the straight of the goods as well as the 
right and wrong side of each section. Now the 
material is ready for the pattern. It is laid on and 
cut just the same as if the material were new. 



>3I 



Vic N * 




ON HIM 



Page 37* 



MAKING OVER A MAN'S SUIT 



Refer to general instructions on re- 
modelling before attempting to make 
over a man's suit into a woman's 
suit. The considerations which per- 
tain particularly to this problem 
follow: 



SIZE 

When making a man's suit into a 
woman's suit, size is an important 
consideration. The man must be 
larger than the woman for whom 
the suit is planned. 

CAN YOU KEEP ANY 
OF THE TAILORING? 

This consideration should govern 
your choice of pattern. So?ne of the 
tailoring may be kept, along the 
front edges and the pockets. If it is 
retained, the pattern bought must 
resemble as nearly as possible the 
original suit. Layout No. 2, p. 37, was 
planned for a problem of this kind. 
Remember if the front is not ripped, 
the coat will button like a man's 
from left to right, but many a good 
fashion was born of necessity. The 
jacket will have to be completely- 
ripped: 

1. If you wish to change buttonholes 
to the right side. 

2. If you wish to turn worn mate- 
rial. 

3. If you are working on a double 
breasted coat. 

4. If the existing tailoring is too 
exaggerated. 



CHOOSING A PATTERN 

Patterns for women's suits have a 
wide variety of designs, but when 
choosing a pattern for remodelling, 
remember that men's suits in general 
have certain characteristics: a seam 
down the back, two darts at the waist, 
a side pocket on the left, and fre- 
quently flap pockets. 

The limitations of material in the 
trousers make it necessary for the 
skirt to be fairly straight. A kick 
pleat or a slight flare is the most you 
can expect. 

The pattern layouts on pages 36-39 
were prepared to help you: first, to 
choose a pattern to fit as many of 
these requirements as possible; then. 
to make the adjustments necessary. 
The patterns were not chosen be- 
cause they were the only ones which 
could be used, but as suggestions to 
make your choice easy and practical. 
Although you see pictured four com- 
plete suits, not all are made of one 
pattern. Some are composed of sepa- 
rate skirts and jackets. The idea was 
that when looking for patterns you 
might be able to find a pattern simi- 
lar to one of the skirts or one of the 
jackets. Then on one of the charts 
you would be able to see how the 
particular problems of the coat and 
the skirt, which you chose, were 
worked out. 





CORRECT SIZE 
OF PATTERN 

The correct size of pattern is essen- 
tial. A tape measure held over the 
bust and hips with ease so that the 
finger may be slipped under it. but 
drawn more snugly around the waist, 
will give your correct measurements. 
Check these measurements with the 
size chart given on every pattern 
envelope. 

LINING 

Usually it is not advisable to use the 
old lining. Rayon twill is a very 
serviceable material although silk 
and other rayons may also be used. 
When lining is used, it is cut from 
the jacket pattern allowing two 
inches at center back for soft pleat. 
Pattern instructions give details. 

INTERFACINGS 

The collar and facings of a suit 
must have interfacings. You may use 
the interfacing already on the suit. 
If that seems too heavy, a lightweight 
muslin or percaline will do. The ma- 
terial must be shrunk before using. 



•32- 



* Directions for hat No. 11, page 20. 



This is done by washing the material 
and pressing while still damp. Do 
the same with the old interfacing, 
if you use it, so as to renew the 
"body." Cut interfacing for front 
facings from same pattern as front 
facings and on the straight grain. 
Cut the interfacing for the collar 
from under collar pattern, cutting on 
the bias. This makes the collar lie 
more smoothly. 

CLEANING ANR RIPPING 

See general directions on p. 31, but 
when sending the suit to be cleaned, 
instruct the tailor not to press the 
crease in the trousers. 

On trousers, rip completely along 
seams. The coat must be entirely 
ripped, if you intend to turn the 
fabric. Otherwise there are certain 
general ripping instructions: remove 



lining and padding, take out sleeves 
and rip them apart, rip collar from 
neckline. Rip shoulder, underarm 
and back seams. 

Instruction for ripping more than 



this will be given on the pages with 
pattern layouts as it varies with the 
type of pattern you choose and 
whether you intend to retain the 
tailoring. 



LIST OF PATTERNS USED ON PATTERN LAYOUTS 

Layout I Jacket and Skirt Hollywood 949 —Pg- 36 

Layout II Jacket and Skirt Advance 2997 pg. 37 

or Skirt ....Butterxck 1056 

or Skirt Hollywood 682 „ 

or Skirt ..Simplicity 3652 

Layout III Jacket — Vogue 9137 — Skirt — Vogue 9001 .pg. 38 

or Jacket Hollywood 800 

or Jacket ......Advance 2617 

or Jacket Simplicity 3652 

Layout IV Bolero — -Vogue 9344 — Skirt — Vogue 9284 pg, 39 

or Bolero Butterick 1979 

or Bolero Hollywood 838 

or Bolero McCall 4188 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS 
FOR CUTTING 

1. All ripped pieces must be thor- 
oughly pressed and threads removed, 
see p. 31. 

2. Pin together corresponding parts, 
same sides of fabric together: front 
sections of trousers, back sections of 
trousers, upper sections of sleeves, 
under sections of sleeves, back sec- 
tions of coat, front sections of coat, 
facings (if they have been ripped). 
This is to save time when cutting out 
the pattern, by cutting two sections 
at once. However the front sections of 
the coat should be cut separately if 
the tailoring is retained. 

3. Take out pattern pieces needed. 

4. Note perforations for straight of 
goods. Mark them with a colored 
pencil, as it is most important that 
these perforations be laid on the 
lengthwise grain (see p. 48) . 

5. Where there is a dart on the pat- 
tern at front shoulder, pin it up, 
matching perforations. 

6. Turn to pattern layout in this 
book suitable to your pattern (find 
your pattern number on the list given 
just before this section and turn to 
the page indicated) . Using the layout 
and the instructions given for each 
layout, cut out your pattern. 




7. In the instructions which follow, 
there are certain words which have 
a special meaning: (a) Lay your pat- 
tern on the fabric means that in do- 
ing so, you must match the perfora- 
tions for the straight of the goods to 
the lengthwise grain (see p. 48). 

(b) Mark means mark darts, seam 
allowances and other indicated points 
with tailor's tacks. To make tailor's 
tacks, use a double thread, and make 
a looped back stitch in each perfora- 
tion, leaving a 1" loop (Fig. 1). Join 
perforations with a basting stitch. 
Clip the latter and remove pattern. 
Separate the two thicknesses of the 
fabric and cut the threads (Fig. 2). 

(c) Cut means cut around pattern, 
cutting notches away from pattern. 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CUT- 
TING— LAYOUT No. 1, P. 36 

For this jacket, the coat of the suit 
was almost entirely ripped apart. 
The one exception was the dart that 
goes straight up from the pocket, 
The trousers were ripped as usual. 
This suit is cut with no adjustment, 
Lay your pattern on the pieces as 
shown, mark and cut. For Lining 
and Interfacing see p. 32. 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CUT- 
TING—LAYOUT No. 2, P. 37 

Jacket ... For this jacket it was 
planned to retain some of the tailor- 
ing of the original coat, so the pock- 
ets, the two front darts, and the front 
edges from the collar joining just 
above the lapels are not ripped. The 
outer edge stitching is ripped down 
to the tip of the lapel and from the 
bottom up to the first button. The 



interfacing is cut to the edge of the 
facing for the coat. 

Back of Coat (Jacket Back) 

1. Pin pattern to back sections of 
coat as shown. Mark seam allow- 
ances and shoulder darts, but dis- 
regard darts at waistline. 

2. Cut around pattern and cut off 
extra piece of pattern. 

Front of Coat (Jacket Front) 

1. Each side will be cut separately. 

2. Lay pattern (dart at shoulder al- 
ready pinned) on front section as 
shown, with edge to edge and 
marking for pockets in line with 
pockets already in coat. The pock- 
ets on coat will be a little farther 
back than on pattern or their posi- 
tion may be a little higher or 
lower. This makes no difference, 
nor does it matter that the lapel 
point of pattern projects a little 
beyond fabric. Pin pattern in a 
few places. 

3. To make pattern lie flat, a new 
dart must be cut from the neckline 
as shown. Draw a line from bot- 
tom perforation of pinned dart to 
the neckline, parallel to dart al- 
ready in lower part of coat, and 
cut along this line. 

4. Smooth pattern out and pin 
around it. Add piece cut from 
back, as shown, matching notches. 
To make it lie flat, slash at inner 
edge at waistline and pleat at 
outer edge, as shown. Pin, mark 
(do not forget new dart at shoul- 
der) and cut around pattern ex- 
cept at front edges. Transfer 
notches at side seam to outer edge. 

Continued on page 34 



•33- 




CUTTING DIRECTIONS 

(Cont'd from page 33) 

Skirt ... The pattern for this skirt 
is made with inverted pleats at center 
back and center front. To change 
this to a four gored skirt, turn under 
pleat extensions on both back and 
front y%" beyond pleat perforations 
towards center edge. The Y2" is for 
a seam allowance. 

Back of Trousers (Skirt Front) Up- 
per Collar is also cut from this 
section. 

1. Lay Skirt Front pattern on back 
sections of trousers as shown. Pin. 

2. If you wish additional fullness as 
indicated by dotted portion of dia- 
gram, measure down 11" from 
top edge along fold of pattern and 
mark. Continue line of lower edge 
of pattern to edge of fabric with 
a basting. Connect end of this line 
with point marked above, as 
shown. This is cutting line. Mark 
and cut. 

3. After Skirt Front is cut, take one 
of remaining pieces and fold on 
lengthwise grain (see p. 48). Place 
Upper Collar pattern with per- 
forations on fold. Mark and cut.- 

Front of Trousers (Skirt Back) Un- 
der Collar is also cut from this 
section. 

1. Lay patterns on front sections of 
trousers, as shown. 

2. If skirt pattern exceeds width of 
fabric, turn it back at side seam as 
shown, graduating in to hipline. 

3. Pin, mark and cut. 

Sleeves 

1. Lay patterns on sleeve sections as 
shown. 

2. Cut off the pattern piece that ex- 
tends beyond the fabric of the 
Upper Sleeve and pin to Under 
Sleeve as indicated. When pinning 
notice that a small amount of 
width is added to keep the outer 
line curved. Mark and cut. 

Belt 

1. Cut belt from any remaining 
fabric. Piece at side seams if neces- 
sary. 

2. If fabric is heavy, face with lining 
material. 

Lining and Interfacings 

See instructions for Linings and 
Interfacings, p. 32. 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CUT- 
TING—LAYOUT No. ,% P. 38 

Jacket ... For this jacket the coat 
was entirely ripped apart except for 
the two front darts. If suit fabric is 
turned, front darts are ripped and 
sewed in again on the other side. 



Back of Coat (Jacket Back) 

There is no special problem. Pin 
pattern to back sections of coat, mark 
and cut. 

Front of Coat (Jacket Front) 

1. Both sides may be cut at one time. 
Lay pattern (dart at shoulder al- 
ready pinned) on front coat sec- 
tions as shown, so that front edge 
comes just to the buttonholes. The 
buttonholes may run a little into 
the seam allowance but this is of 
no consequence. Pocket perfora- 
tions should come above the pocket 
slash. Pin pattern in a few places. 

2. To make pattern lie flat, a new 
dart must be cut from the armhole 
to lower perforation of shoulder 
dart as indicated. It should come 
below pocket slash. 

3. Smooth pattern out and pin all 
around. If rever of pattern seems 
to extend out a little too far, take 
a small pleat in it, graduating it 
as shown. Mark seam allowances 
and new dart. Disregard waistline 
darts on pattern. When fitting 
coat it may be necessary to take 
in existing darts a little. 

Front Facings • . . Lay pattern 
on so that front edge is in back of 
buttonholes. If rever of Jacket Front 
was made smaller by a pleat, take 
the same pleat in the Facing as was 
taken in the front. Pin, mark, and 
cut. It makes no difference if facings 
are a little narrower than the pat- 
tern. Allow the extra piece on the 
lining. 

Skirt . . . 

Front of Trousers (Skirt Front) 

Pockets are also cut from this section. 

1. Lay Skirt Front on front sections 
of trousers as shown. Be sure it is 
far enough from the edge to allow 
for seam at outer edge and far 
enough down so that pockets may 
be cut from piece above. Pin. mark 
and cut. 

2, Pin Pockets on remaining pieces 
as indicated. By cutting on bias 
(see p. 48) as shown, a nice effect 
is produced in a herringbone 
tweed. Pockets may also be cut 
straight. 

Back of Trousers (Skirt Back) 

Collars and Pleat Insert are also cut 
from this section. 

1. Lay Skirt Back on back sections 
of trousers so that pleat extension 
is on lengthwise grain of fabric. 
Pin, mark and cut. 

2. From one of two remaining pieces 
the Collars are cut. Pattern pieces 
are shown in proper position. From 
the other piece the Pleat Insert 
is cut with the center back on a 
lengthwise fold. 



Sleeves ... See instructions for 
Sleeves under Layout No. 2, p. 34. 

Kelt ... See instructions for Belt 
under Layout No. 2, p. 34. 

Lining and Interfacings ... 

See instructions for Linings and In- 
terfacings, p. 32. 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CUT- 
TING—LAYOUT No. 4, P. 39- 

Jacket ... 

Back of Coat (Jacket Back) Lower 
Front Facing is also cut from this 
section. 

1. Pin Jacket Back to back sections 
of coat as shown, about % of an 
inch in from center back to allow 
for seams. Mark and cut as usual. 

2. Pin. mark, and cut Lower Front. 
Facing from same piece. 

Front of Coat (Jacket Front) Lower 
Back and Back Facings are also cut 
from this section. 

1. Lay Jacket Front (dart already 
pinned) on front sections of coat 
above lower pocket openings and 
with edge at back of buttonholes. 
Pin in a few places. 

2. To make pattern lie flat a new 
dart must be cut from lower edge 
as shown. About two inches be- 
yond % the distance from the 
front edge to the underarm seam- 
cut a slash which extends to the 
lowest perforation for the shoul- 
der dart. 

3. Smooth pattern out and pin. 

4. Mark and cut in usual manner. 

5. Pin, mark and cut Lower Back 
and Back Facings from same 
pieces. 

Front Fneings . . . 

1. Pin Front Facing patterns to fac- 
ing sections of coat as shown. 
Mark and cut. 

Skirt ... 

This skirt pattern has three pieces,, 
one for the front and two for the 
back. The two back portions are 
pinned together as shown. The result 
is a four gored skirt. 

Front of Trousers (Skirt Back) 

1. Pin back sections of pattern to- 
gether, lapping the pieces by 
matching seam perforations from 
hipline to lower edge and allow- 
ing them to spread from hipline 
to upper edge. 

2. Lay pattern on front sections of 
trousers as shown, allowing about 
Y 2 inch at edge for seam allow- 
ance. If pattern extends beyond 
fabric, turn back equal amount 
from upper to lower edge as 
shown. The notches are trans- 
ferred to outer edge. Measure 
amount pattern pieces spread at 
back and take this amount from 



.34. 



back seam as shown. Pin, mark 
and cut. 
3. Cut off piece of pattern turnsd 

back. 
Back of Trousers (Skirt Front) 
1. Lay pattern on back sections of 
trousers as shown, adding the 
piece cut off back, as shown, 
matching notches. Pin, mark and 
cut. Transfer the notches. 
Sleeves ... The sleeves of this 
pattern are made in one piece and 
will not be suitable for use in this 
bolero jacket. Use a two-section 
sleeve pattern from a jacket pattern 
of the same make as the bolero. See 
instructions for Sleeve under Layout 
No. 2, p. 34. 

Belt ... See instructions for Belt, 
Layout No. 2, p. 34. 
Lining and Interfacings ... 
See instructions for Linings and In- 
terfacings, p. 32. 

HINTS ON 
TAILORING 

Pressing* ... It cannot be repeated 
too often that pressing is the secret 
of successful sewing, especially tailor- 
ing (see general instructions on 
pressing, p. 49). 

How to Finish Front and Col- 
lar of Snit When Tailoring 
Is Ripped 

Interfacing and Taping on 
Front of Jacket 

When the side seams are sewed 
and pressed, place jacket fiat on table, 
wrong side out. Pin interfacings to 
f i-onts. Baste shoulder seams. Try on 
jacket (right side out) and pin to- 
gether at front where top button will 
come. Turn back lapels to see where 
natural roll in collar occurs. Mark 
the line of the roll with pins. 

Remove jacket and turn again to 
wrong side. A little beyond line of 
pins toward the armhole run a bast- 
ing line. Using this line as a guide, 
secure the two fabrics together with 
diagonal bastings (Fig. 3), making 
sure to catch only the top layer of 
under fabric so that stitches do not 
show through. Diagonal basting is a 
straight up and down stitch, catching 
two thicknesses of fabric together 
combined with a slanting stitch on 
top of fabric. Work from inside out 
toward edge. 

When this section is entirely cov- 
ered with diagonal bastings check the 
lapels to see that they are even. The 
best way to do this is to make a 
cardboard form of the lapel pattern. 
Cut seam allowance off pattern. On 
a piece of cardboard trace around the 
lapel part of the pattern and cut out 
the form. Apply this form to the 
lapel and mark around it. The mark- 



ing line is the new seam line. Baste 
entire facing to coat at seam line. 
Next baste twill tape, about J /2 " wide, 
flush with seam line, mitering the 
tape at the point of lapel. First sew 
edge to seam line with fine hemming 
stitch and then sew the other edge to 
the interfacing. Trim away seam al- 
lowance on the interfacing (Fig. 4). 

Interfacing and Taping on Collar 

For collar, stitch center seams in 
under section of collar and interfac- 
ing and press open. Baste the under 
section of collar and interfacing to- 
gether around the seam allowance. 
Inside seam allowance, from notch to 
notch, make a curved row of machine 
stitching which reaches about Vs of 
the way up the collar (Fig. 5). Make 
several rows inside this row about 
*4" apart, as shown. Using top 
curved line as a guide, cover the rest 
of the collar with diagonal bastings, 
keeping within the seam line (Fig. 
5). Tape top and side edges of collar 
in same way described for front fac- 
ings. Cut away seam allowance on 
interlining. 

Applying Collar and Facings 

Baste and stitch under section of 
the collar to the jacket. Press seams 
open, clip seam allowance to make 
collar lie flat and tape seam line as 
before. Baste and stitch upper section 
of collar to front facings. Press seams 
open and clip. 

Pin facings and collar to jacket, 
right sides together and stitch around, 
using outside of tape as a guide line. 
Clip off corners. Trim off seams, one 
a little narrower than the other. 
Turn facing to wrong side of jacket. 
Baste and press. The entire outer 
edge may be machine stitched close 
to edge. If you wish to omit the 
machine stitching there is another 
way of preventing the facing from 
rolling to the right side. Begin at 
bottom of coat, and on the wrong 
side sew close to the edge with a 
combination of back and blind 
stitches (see p. 48). These stitches 
must be firm but not tight and should 
catch the seam allowance and facing 
together. If there is a lapel, reverse 
the work at the point where the lapel 
begins. Turn hem on jacket and catch 
stitch (see p. 48). Baste inner edge 
of facing to inside of jacket, turning 
rever out while doing so, to make 



sure it is not too tight. Catch stitch 
to jacket. 

How to Finish Front and Col- 
lar of Snit When Tailoring 
Is Retained 

Prepare under section of collar as 
described under Interfacing and Tap- 
ing on Collar. Seam under section of 
collar to jacket, right side to right 
side and press. Turn facing out over 
the right side of jacket. At lower edge 
of jacket, stitch facing and front to- 
gether, continuing original seam. At 
neck edge, stitch upper section of col- 
lar to facings (the collar will be 
placed under the facings, right side 
of collar and to right side of facings). 
Press seam open. Sew upper and un- 
der sections of collar together, con- 
tinuing the stitching down the edge 
of the rever and keeping an even 
line until it merges with old seam. 
Trim seams, clip corners and turn 
facing to inside of jacket. Baste 
around outer edge of collar and rever 
and lower edge of jacket. Press. Fin- 
ish edges with stitching the same as 
front edge stitch. To hide ends of 
thread leave long enough ends when 
finishing off machine stitching to 
thread a needle and bring the ends 
through to the inside of jacket. Turn 
lower hem and catch stitch to coat. 
Baste inner edge of facing to inside 
of jacket, turning rever out while 
doing so to make sure that it is not 
too tight. Catch stitch to jacket. 

Skirts . . • On all of the skirts 
there will be a center seam back and 
front and side seams. Where there 
is an inserted pleat the pattern in- 
structions will give details. 

How to Cover Poeket Open- 
ings ... To close pocket openings, 
cut strips of lining fabric 1%," wide 
and the length of the openings plus 
one inch. Press or baste */g inch seams 
around all edges of strips. Baste on 
right side of openings, keeping fabric 
smooth. Stitch strips on edges. Press 
with a damp cloth. These strips will 
be hidden by the pockets. On the 
bolero you may wish to use a pocket 
of the same material as the jacket. 
If the material is a dark smooth 
fabric, a pocket or even a band of 
faille ribbon would be very attractive. 

Lining • • . See pattern instructions 
and How to Sew in Lining, page 12. 






For service — Use J. & P. Coats — Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 



•35' 




JACKET AND SKIRT 
HOLLYWOOD 949 

This suit is cut out without any special adjust- 
ment by laying the pieces on the suit as directed. 
The original suit was entirely ripped except for 
the dart which comes straight up from the pocket. 
When making the suit, follow the pattern 
directions carefully. Special tailoring hints — 
page 35;^ easy sewing suggestions— page 48; full 
cutting instructions — page 33. 



This drawing and the picture on 
page 32 show the suit as it 
appears when completely remade. 





TKOUSER 



>36< 





r o.2 



JACKET AND SKIRT 

ADVANCE 2997 

This jacket pattern was chosen so that some of the tailoring of 
the coat might be retained. It has pockets similar to those on a 
man's suit and the other features necessary. Notice that when 
the coat is made over, the tailoring along the edge from the 
lapel down is not cut to conform to the pattern but kept "as is." 

The parts of this coat which were not ripped were the pock- 
ets, the two front darts, the front edges from the collar joining. 
The outer edge stitching was ripped down to the tip of the lapel 
and from the bottom up to the last button. 

The skirt pattern has one pleat down the center back and 
front. When cutting the pattern the pleat is removed as shown 
and a slightly flared four gored skirt results. 

Other skirts that may be used for the same effect — Butterick 
1056, Hollywood 682, Simplicity 3652. 

Full cutting instructions — page 33; special tailoring hints — 
page 35; easy sewing suggestions — page 48. 



This drawing and the picture on page 32 show 
the suit as it appears when completely remade. 




•37- 



c^^/^/e/fe # S 



JACKET-VOGUE 9137 

For this jacket pattern, the coat was entirely ripped apart 
except for the two front darts. If suit fabric is turned, front 
darts are ripped and sewed in again on the other side. Direc- 
tions are given on page 35 for closing the pocket slits which 
are then covered with patch pockets. Sometimes an extra 
pocket is added at the top. 

Other jacket patterns that may be used for the same effect, 
Hollywood 800, Advance 2617, Simplicity 3652. 

SKIRT- VOGUE 0OOI 

The skirt was chosen because it is straight and has a kick 
pleat in the back which can be easily cut from the material 
available. 

Full cutting instructions — pages 33, 34; special tailoring 
hints — page 35; easy sewing suggestions — page 48. 

This drawing and the picture on page 32 show 
the suit as it appears when completely remade. 




v^^>^^^/9>$M^??^^\.\.. t \ aaa 






•33* 



f£z\ % 








BOLERO-VOGUE 9344 

To make the bolero, the coat must be entirely ripped. The 
pattern has no seam down the back but since the original 
suit is made with one, an allowance is made at the back for 
a seam. Directions are given for closing the pocket slit on 
page 35. This may be concealed by a pocket. 

The sleeves of this pattern are made in one piece and will 
not be suitable for use in this bolero jacket. Use a two-section 
sleeve pattern from a jacket pattern of the same make as the 
bolero. 

Other boleros which may be used are Butterick 1979, 
Hollywood 838, McCall 4188. 

SKIRT-VOGUE 9284 

The skirt was chosen because it can be easily converted into 
a four gored skirt. The pattern has three pieces — a front, a 
back, and a side back. 

Full cutting instructions — pages 34, 35; special tailoring 
hints — p. 35; easy sewing suggestions — p. 48. 



The drawing shows the suit as it 
appears when completely remade* 





•3?' 



F~ 




1. Girl's Blouse From Two White Broadcloth 
Shirts (McCall 3761). 2. Girl's Blouse From A 
Man's Shirt (McCall 4580). 3A-B. Child's Un- 
derwear From A Man's White Broadcloth Shirt 
(Simplicity 3645) . 4. Child's Pajamas From Two 
Contrasting Shirts (Simplicity S615). 5. Child's 
Smocked Dress From A Man's Shirt (McCall 
936). 6. Boy's Suit From Two Contrasting Shirts 
(Hollywood 948). 7. Child's Dress From Two 
Contrasting Shirts (Hollywood 950). 



•40- 



8. Child's Dress From A Striped Shirt (McCall 4553) . 9. Child's Over- 
alls From A Striped Shirt (McCall 832 or DuBarry 2475B) . lO. Boy's 
Blouse From A Man's Shirt (Simplicity 1509 or DuBarry 2346B). 
11. Child's Sunsuit And Bonnet From A Man's Shirt (Simplicity 
3272). 12. Child's Pinafore From A Man's Shirt (Simplicity 2716). 







Layouts for Cutting Garments from Men's Shirts 




•42- 



For servip^Vse J. & P. Coats— Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 




Jerkin From Dress (Advance 5047). 
Jumper From Dress (Hollywood 499). 
Jacket From Dress (McCall 4764). 
Playsuit From Dress (Simplicity 3392). 
Weskit From Jacket (Butterick 2098 
or DuBarry 5416). 




k'| Wl 



lO. Bathing Suit From 
Dress (Simplicity 3885 or 
DuBarry 5372 for Shorts, 
Simplicity 3164 or Du- 
Barry 5439 for Top). 















6. Bolero and Skirt From Coat (Simplicity 
4221 for Bolero, 3885 for Skirt). 7. Daytime 
Dress From Evening Dress (Simplicity 4221). 
8 and B. Pinafores From Dresses by Cutting 
Out Sleeves and Underarm Sections. 



•43 - 





To learn how to knit see Book 1 70, "LEARN HOW" 





8. Boy's Coat From A Man's 
Coat (Butterick2205). 



5. Boy's Suit From A Man's 
Suit (Butterick2180). 

6. Child's Overalls, Jacket, 
Cap from A Flannel Bathrobe 
(Simplicity 4114). 

7. Child's Coat from a Man's 
White Flannel Trousers 
(McCall4222). 



See Next Page For Layouts 
For Cutting These Garments 









o 



•45- 



Layout for Cutting Junior Garments 




•46- 



For service— Use J. & p. Coats— Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 



GIRL'S WESKIT FItOM 

MAN'S VEST 

(Illustration on page 44) 

Knitted Back and 
Matching Calot 

MATERIALS: 

Chadwick's Red Heart Shetland 

Floss, 3 balls for sizes 12 and 14; 

4 balls for sizes 16 and IS. 
Clark's- O.N.T. Knitting Pins, 1 

pair No. 3 for sizes 12 and 14; 1 

pair No. 4 for sizes 16 and 18. 
Clark's O.N.T. Bone Sock Needles, 

1 set No. 3. 

Steel crochet hook No. 2. 

3 buttons of graduated sizes for top 

of calot. 

VEST BACK . . . Cast on 78 sts. 
Work in ribbing of k 2, p 2 for 2 
inches. Inc 1 st at both ends of next 
row and every 5th row thereafter 
until there are 98 sts. Work straight 
until piece measures same as side 
edge of fabric front. 

To Shape Armholes: Bind off 4 sts 
at beginning of next 2 rows. Dec 1 
st at both ends of every 5th row until 
66 sts remain. Work straight until 
piece measures same as armhole 
depth of fabric front. 

To Shape Shoulders: Bind off 6 sts 
at beginning of each row until 30 
sts remain. Bind off for back of neck. 
With right side facing work a row 



of s c along armhole, shoulder and 
back of neck edges. Fasten off. 
Pin shoulder edges of f abric front and 
knitted back together and stitch (*4" 
seams) with sewing thread to match 
front. Sew underarm seams in same 
way. Press seams open. 
CALOT . . . With double yarn cast 
on 93 sts. Divide sts among 3 needles. 
Join being careful not to twist sts. 
Work in rnds of ribbing of k 2, p 1 
for 2 inches. Break off 1 strand of 
yarn. On next rnd inc in each p st 
(124 sts). Now work in ribbing of 
k 2, p 2 until piece measures 6 1 /2 
inches in all. Next rnd: Dec 1 st in 
each knit rib. Work in ribbing of p 
2, k 1 until piece measures Z 1 /^ inches 
in all. Following rnd: Dec 1 st in 
each purl rib. Work in ribbing of k 
1, p 1 until piece measures 8 inches 
in all. Next rnd: K 2 together around. 
Break yarn leaving an 8-inch length. 
Thread a needle with this length and 
slip sts off needles onto it. Draw to- 
gether tightly and fasten securely. 
Turn Calot, then turn up the 2 inch 
cuff having the k 2 rib of cuff on 
right side of Calot. 
TRIM . . . Ch 2. 1st rnd: 6 s c in 2nd 
ch from hook. Do not join rnds. 2nd 
rnd: 2 s c in each st around. 3rd 
rnd: * S c in next s c, 2 s c in next 
s c. Repeat from * around. Continue 
thus increasing 6 s c each rnd until 
piece covers surface of button. Work 



1 rnd straight. Then dec every 3rd 
st until opening is closed — to dec 
work off 2 sts as 1 st. Fasten off. 
Cover other 2 buttons in same way. 
Sew one button on top of the other, 
then fasten to the top of the Calot. 

Cutting Down Vest 

Cut vest apart at shoulder and under- 
arm seams. Fit front and back of 
vest to figure. Second button from 
bottom should be at waistline. Pin 
seams (directly on top of shoulders) 
so that waistline is in this position. 
Vest will extend away from figure at 
front armhole. Draw this excess down 
to underarm seam and make a dart 
into underarm seam. Pin dart. Take 
off vest. Mark shoulder seams and 
side seams on front of vest with bast- 
ings. Mark underarm darts in both 
vest and lining. Pin both fronts to- 
gether. Cut off at shoulder and sides 
allowing 1" for seams. 

Stitch darts in vest and lining sep- 
arately. Slash darts in vest and press 
open. 

Turn under % " on vest and lining 
at shoulder and underarm seams, rip- 
ping back outside stitching where 
necessary. Baste edges together. 
Press. Stitch close to edge by ma- 
chine. Make and attach knitted back 
as directions specify. 



These garments and other wool articles for which directions are given 
in this book may be made from wool which has been reclaimed from dis- 
carded knitwear. Instructions for reclaiming such wool are given below. 



HOW TO RECLAIM 
USED WOOL 

Any knitted garment from which 
wool is being reclaimed must be 
washed and dried thoroughly and 
then unraveled. Do not try to un- 
ravel a sweater which is closely mat- 
ted. Hand-knit sweaters are very 
easily ripped, for the wool winds off 
in one continuous motion. For a 
hand-knit sweater the process is as 
follows. 

1. Wind the strand of wool which is 
being unraveled, around a bread 
board taking care that the end is 
visible. Continue until you have a 
sufficiently large skein. Then 
break off the wool. 

2. Tie the starting and finishing 
ends of the raveled piece on the 
board together. 

3. At 4 equal distances apart, tie a 
white thread around the strands 
of wool on the board. 

4. Remove wool from bread board. 

5. Repeat steps 1 to 4 until entire 
garment is unraveled. 

6. Dip the raveled skein of wool into 



warm water until thoroughly 
soaked. 

7. Squeeze out excess water. 

8. Tying a weight to the bottom of 
the wet skein to remove kinks, 
hang skein up to dry. Do not ex- 
pose directly to the sun. An airy 
place is best. 

9. When thoroughly dry, wind into 
balls. Now you are ready to knit. 

On a machine-knit sweater with 
side seams it is not practical to un- 
ravel. This may be treated as regular 
fabric and cut up into small articles. 
The seam edges should be closely 
overcast, if this is done. 

A machine-knit sweater without 
side seams may be unraveled. The 
process is as follows: 

1. Cut off top part of sweater from 
beginning of armhole shaping, 
and begin to unravel from that 
point. 

2. Pick up the top strand of wool 
which is being unraveled, and 
wind it around a bread board for 
one complete round. This strand, 
at the end of the round, will be 




1 to 8 rounds down from top, de- 
pending on the number of strands. 

3. Pick up the next strand, and wind 
it into a ball for one complete 
round. This strand, at the end of 
the round, will be directly under 
the end of the previous round. 

4. Repeat step 3 as many more times 
as you have strands. 

5. Repeat steps 2 to 4 inclusive until 
the lower section of sweater is 
completely unraveled. 

6. Complete the operation by doing 
steps 2 to 9 on directions for hand- 
knit sweater. Each ball must be 
first wound around board into a 
skein. 



Knitting abbreviations, page 50 



.47. 




'M^/fJM 



FOR EASY SEWING 



CUTTING ON THE 
CORRECT GRAIN 

"Grain" means the direction of the threads of a fabric. 
Therefore, "lengthwise grain" means the thread running 
the length of the fabric piece, parallel to the selvage or 
finished side edges of the piece. "Crosswise grain" is the 
thread running across the fabric from selvage to selvage. 
A piece is cut or torn from the bolt along the "crosswise 
grain." Marks on pattern pieces indicating "straight of 
goods" must be placed on the lengthwise grain of the 
fabric, that is, on a thread parallel to the selvage edge. 
This is the most important part of correct cutting since 
straight grains determine correct fit. 

The lengthwise grain or thread is 
very firm while the crosswise grain 
has some stretch. The grains may be 
felt by taking a scrap of fabric and 
pulling with the grain both ways. 
The most stretch in any fabric is the 
true bias which is not a straight grain 
but which is a perfect diagonal across 
the fabric. To find the true bias, 
bring the lengthwise straight of goods 
(the selvage) to meet the crosswise 
grain. The fold is the true bias 
(Fig. 1). 




BASTING AND STITCHING 
A PLAIN SEAM 

In the directions for making all items in the book, "stitch" 
means to do as follows: 

1. Pin edges together right side to 
right side matching any notches. 
Place pins at right angles to edge 
about IY2" apart. 

2. Baste a scant Y%' from edge. Using 
a single, knotted thread and taking 
even stitches about y 2 " long. 

3. Stitch by machine Y2" from edge 
(Fig. 2). 

4. Remove basting by clipping at 
short intervals so that it does not 
draw fabric. 

5. Press seam open (unless direc- 
tions specify differently) . 




SEAMS 




1. French Seam ... A seam used on 
lightweight fabrics for infants' and 
children's clothes. Baste wrong sides 
of garment together. Stitch 1 / 4" 
nearer edge than indicated seam line. 
Trim seam to Y%" • Turn to wrong 
side. Fold on seam line. Baste Ys" 
from fold edge. Stitch *4" from edge 
by hand or machine (Fig, 3). 

2. Flat Fell Seam ... A strong tail- 
ored seam for Houses, children's 
clothes, pajamas. Baste wrong sides 
of garment together. Stitch along 
seam line. Press seam towards back 
of garment (armhole seams into 



sleeve). Trim under side of seam 
allowance to Ys" • Turn under edge 
of upper seam allowance so that seam 
is 1 / 4" wide. Baste down over trimmed 
seam. Stitch close to edge by machine 
(Fig. 4). 

3. Top Stitched Seam ... A seam 
made from right side, for applying 
yokes, etc. Fold, baste, and press seam 
allowance under on one piece. Baste 
fold edge against seam line on second 
piece. Stitch from right side close to 
fold edge (Fig. 5). 

SEAM FINISHES 






1. Pinking ... A finish for fabrics which will not fray. 
Trim edges with pinking shears being careful not to cut 
into fabric (Fig. 6). 

2. Overcasting . . . Make firm, short, slanting stitches 
close together over edges (Fig. 7). 

3. Machine Back Stitch . . . Fold raw edge back 1 /g" to %" 
and stitch close to fold by machine (Fig. 8). 

GATHERING 

To machine gather, adjust machine 
stitch to 6 or 8 stitches to the inch. 
Run two rows of stitching along the 
edge to be gathered, one row on Y2" 
seam line and the other %" from 
edge. Pull stitching up to proper 
measurement by pulling under (bob- 
bin) threads of both rows at the same 
time. Pull top threads through to wrong side and knot 
both thread ends together to hold gathers in place. Dis- 
tribute gathers evenly. When stitching gathered piece to 
another, stitch along Yi" gathering line (Fig. 9). 



USEFUL STITCHES 

1. Back Stitch ... A firm hand 
stitch. Take a small stitch. Take a 
second stitch back over first one 
bringing needle to right side of fabric 
the length of stitch ahead of first 
stitch (Fig. 10). 

2. Blind Hem Stitch ... A strong 
hem, invisible from right side. Slide 
needle under fold. Push it through 
and pick up one thread directly un- 
derneath, making a straight stitch at 
right angles to hem edge (Fig. 11). 




•48' 



For service— Use J. & P. Coats — Clark's 



threads in correct sizes 









3. Buttonhole Stitch ... A firm re- 
inforcement for edges. Thread needle 
with a double thread. Hold edge over 
forefinger. Take a few running 
stitches to the left of starting point, 
to anchor thread. (These will be cov- 
ered with buttonhole stitches.) Bring 
needle through from wrong side at 
desired depth. Hold thread near fab- 
ric back over forefinger (with middle 
finger). Draw thread on needle to 
right and then left under needle. 
Loop is brought to raw edge when 
stitch is pulled up (Fig. 12). To 
make Buttonholes, make small run- 
ning stitches close around buttonhole 
marking through both fabric and fac- 
ing. Slash along marking. Finish raw 
edges with Buttonhole Stitches made 
close together (Fig. 13). To make 
Thread Loops, make loop to fit button 
from several strands of thread. But- 
tonhole Stitch closely together around 
these threads (Fig. 14). 

4. Catch Stitch ... A hem, invisible 
from right side, for heavy fabrics, — 
skirts, coats. Work from left to right. 
Take up a few threads of fabric, be- 
ing careful not to have stitches show 
on right side. Take a similar stitch in 
hem about *4 " to the right. Continue 
stitch, making zig-zag as shown (Fig. 
15). 

5. Overhand or Whip Stitch ... A 

firm invisible method of joining two 
edges. Place edges together. Take 
small over and over stitches, close 
together, through both thicknesses 
(Fig. 16). 

6. Roll Hem Stitch ... A narrow 
hem for lightweight fabrics. Machine 
stitch close to edge of material. Trim 
close. Roll edge between thumb and 
forefinger and slip stitch (Fig. 18). 
Finished hem should be less than Y 8 " 
wide (Fig. 17). 

7. Slip Stitch ... A hem, invisible 
from both sides, for dresses, skirts. In- 
sert needle on fold, slip it along about 
*4" or more and bring it through. 
Take up 1 to 3 threads of fabric di- 
rectly under point where needle 
comes through, draw thread through 
and begin next stitch (Fig. 18). 



(toward raw edge of bias strip). Fold 
raw edge in *4" (to meet raw edges 
of seam). Slip stitch (Fig. 18) fold 
edge to seam on wrong side (Fig. 19). 



CTTTING AND APPLYING 
A BIAS BINDING 

Bring lengthwise straight of goods to meet crosswise (see 
p. 48 . Pm. Press fold. This fold is the true bias. Cut along 
fold and cut bias strips 1" wide from this edge. (Prepared 
Bias Trim may be purchased already cut and folded). 
Stitch bias strip to raw edge %" from edge. Press seam up 




PRESSING 

Success or failure in making a garment often depends on 
the way it is pressed during the making as well as after 
completion. 

General Suggestions ... 

1. Have two pressing cloths, one of muslin, one of drill 
cloth. Remove all sizing by washing well before using. 

2. Always test temperature of iron on scrap of fabric be- 
fore pressing. 

3. Press seams immediately after stitching. Do not wait 
until dress is completed. 

4. Never rest iron on fabric. Keep it moving constantly 
to avoid marking fabric. 

5. Press all seams up from bottom or in towards center 
of garment. 

6. Press darts on light fabrics to one side, either up or 
towards center. On heavy fabrics slash darts and press 
open. 

7. Lift gathers while working point of iron into them. 

8. While pressing, always smooth garment into correct 
shape so that fabric is not stretched. Continue smoothing 
fabric before passing iron over it to avoid pressing creases 
into it. 

9. Follow these suggestions in pressing: 

a. Cotton . . . Turn garment to right side, sponge lightly 
and press with moderately hot iron. If sheen appears 
on test scrap use damp muslin pressing cloth. 

b. Linen . . . Turn garment to wrong side, sponge lightly 
and press with moderately hot iron. 

c. Rayon and Silk . , . Turn garment to wrong side and 
press with moderately warm iron. When moisture in 
pressing is necessary first cover garment with a dry 
drill cloth. Then place a damp muslin cloth on top. The 
steam will penetrate drill cloth without leaving a sheen 
on fabric. 

d. Wool . . . Turn garment to wrong side and cover with 
a damp muslin pressing cloth. Press with moderate 
iron until cloth is almost dry. This steams fabric. Re- 
place damp cloth with dry cloth. Continue pressing 
until almost dry. Pressing woolen garments until they 
are completely dry gives a sheen to garment. To pre- 
vent seam marks on right side of fabric, slip narrow 
strip of cardboard between seam and garment while 
pressing. 



For complete information on sewing techniques, see Book No. 1©9, "SEW and SAVE." •49' 




SUPPLIES to MAKE and MEND 



Needle Sizes and Correct Threads 

For General Sewing: Sharps — medium length, small rounded eyes; Betweens — short length for short fine 
stitches. 

For Darning: Cotton Darners — extra long, long eyes to hold several strands of thread; Yarn Darners — 

extra coarse, heavy darners for sweaters, wool socks, blankets, 
Milward's Sewing Needles, assortment of sizes 3 to 9 takes care of ordinary requirements. 


Sewing Needle 
Size 


Type of Fabric 


Thread Size 


Machine Needles 


Machine Stitch 
per inch 


Coarsest (3) 


Heavy duck, canvas, coat- 
ing. 


8, 10, 12 Black and White 


Coarsest 


8 


Coarse (4, 5) 


Ticking, denim, sewing 
buttons on heavy material. 


16, 20, 24 Black and White 


Coarse 


10,12 


Medium Coarse 

(6) 


Cretonne, slip covers, 
wools, sewing buttons on 
medium-heavy material. 


30, 36, 40 Black and White. 
Heavy Duty Mercerized 
Thread in colors. 


Medium Coarse 


12 


Medium (7) 


Percale, gingham, rayon, 
linen, lightweight wool. 


50, 60, 70 Black and White. 
Mercerized in colors. 


Medium 


14 


Medium Fine (8) 


Voile, lawn. 


80, Black and White. Mer- 
cerized in colors. 


Medium Fine 


16,18 


• Fine (9) 


Organdie, Batiste. 


100, Black and White. 

Mercerized in colors. 


Fine 


20,22 


Threads for Hand and Machine Sewing 


Bias Trim 


Best 6-Cord Sew- 
ing Threads 
Clark's O.N.T. or 
J. & P. Coats 


Black and White 
Size 8, 10, 12, 16, 

20, 24, 30, 36, 40, 
50, 60, 70, 80, 100. 


For general ma- 
chine and hand 
sewing. Coarser 
or finer sizes ac- 
cording to fabric. 


Percale and Fine 
Lawn 
J. & P. Coats 


Single and double 
fold. Black, white, 
colors. *Boilfast. 


For binding, fin- 
ishing and trim- 
ming. 


Darning and Mending Threads 


Mercerized Sew- 
ing 

Clark's O.N.T. or 
J. & P. Coats 


Size 50. Black, 
White and colors. 


For general ma- 
chine and hand 
sewing on colored 
fabric of cotton, 
silk, rayon, wool 
or linen. 


Mercerized Darn- 
ing 
Clark's O.N.T. or 
J. & P. Coats 
Plain Darning 
Clark's O.N.T. or 
J. & P. Coats 
Mending Wool 
Chadwick's 


All threads 
matched to fash- 
ionable and popu- 
lar hosiery. Also 
compact, conven- 
ient assortments 
in packages. 


For silk, nylon, 
rayon, or lisle 
hosiery. 


For cotton hos- 
iery. 


Heavy Duty 
J. & P. Coats 


Black, White and 
colors. 


For sewing heav- 
ier fabrics, es- 
pecially slip cov- 
ers, draperies, for 
sewing on buttons, 
for heavy wools. 


For wool hosiery 
and sweaters. 


Crochet, Tatting and Embroidery Threads 

Clark's O.N.T. and J. & P. Coats threads come in a wide 
assortment of sizes and colors, suitable for fashion and 
household articles. Boilfast* colors. 


Button & Carpet 
Clark's O.N.T. 


Extra strong, 
Black, White and 
colors. 


For sewing extra 


heavy fab-r 
for sewing 

tons. 


cs and 
on but- 


Wools 

Chadwick's Red Heart Wools are made for every pur- 
pose. 



ABBREVIATIONS in CROCHET and KNITTING 



ch chain 

sc single crochet 

d c double crochet 

h d c half double crochet 

tr treble 

d tr . . . double treble 

tr tr triple treble 



si st . slip stitch 

pc st popcorn stitch 

sp space 

st stitch 

sts stitches 

rnd round 



incl inclusive 

inc increase 

dec decrease 

k . knit 

P purl 

tog together 

p.s.s.o. .... pass slip st over k st 



*( asterisk) Repeat the instructions following the asterisk as many more times as specified. 
Note: Sometimes instead of an asterisk you will see a phrase like (k 2 tog, k 2) 5 times. This means 
that whatever is included in the parenthesis should be repeated the number of times specified directly 
after the closed parenthesis. 



50 



♦Trade Mark